CFPs in Renaissance Intellectual History

Figuring the Femme Fatale [&] Family Matters


Source of Information: RENAIS-L 2001-01-09
Date of Event: 2001-12-27 to 30
Location of event: New Orleans, USA
Deadline for abstracts etc.: 2001-03-16




MLA DIVISION OF SIXTEENTH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE
CALL FOR PAPERS:
SESSION 1: FIGURING THE FEMME FATALE
SESSION 2: FAMILY MATTERS
We welcome your submission of proposals for the 2001 Annual Convention of
the Modern Language Association, to be held December 27-30 in New Orleans,
Louisiana. Submissions must reflect papers that will be presented for the
first time at the convention conference.
For further information, contact Professor Dora Polachek, Binghamton
University, NY; (607) 777-6507; 

Proposals are to be sent to
Professor Dora E. Polachek, Binghamton University, Dept. of Romance
Languages and Literatures, Library Tower 506, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000.
Proposals: 500-word abstracts or completed papers
Deadline: Proposals must be received by mail by Friday, March 16, 2001
(sorry, no e-mail submissions)
SESSION 1: FIGURING THE FEMME FATALE
A woman whose allure and attraction are linked to death and destruction,
the femme fatale has served as an important literary theme through the
ages. This session aims to further our understanding by considering
questions that may include but are not limited to the following:
what traits distinguish the sixteenth century's femme fatale, and in what
ways does she transgress the strictures and structures of her world? How
do male and female writers create new images of her, or in what ways do
they rework mythological, biblical or medieval constructions? What does
the image of the femme fatale tell us about a society's anxieties about
prescribed gender roles? With the femme fatale, the potential for
violence and eroticized aggression cease to be solely part of the male
domain, and are figured as part of female behavior. How do these literary
representations mirror the social and political preoccupations of the
culture that produces them? In what ways does literature's cruel,
libidinally driven, self assertive woman relate to the historical and
political realities of the period?
SESSION 2: FAMILY MATTERS
How does the sixteenth century represent family structures and what
significance does it attribute to them? How are mothers, fathers, children
and their interrelationships portrayed? What relationship is there between
absent mothers or fathers and notions of identity and subject formation?
To what political or social uses is the myth of family unity put? Is the
sixteenth century predisposed to depicting certain family dramas, as
opposed to others, and to what ends? How do depictions of family
relations relate to concerns about hierarchy and patriarchy? How are
family matters deployed in satirical or comic works?
Dora E. Polachek, Ph. D.
Binghamton University
Dept of Foreign Langs & Lits.
P.O. Box 6000
Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
Tel: 607 777-6507
FAX: 607 777-2644
Anna M. DiStefano