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Renaissance not mentioned (Read 28334 times)
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Renaissance not mentioned
26.03.2008 at 08:16:35
 
I guess this section of Web4Ren Forum (W4RF) is a good place for a thread on CFPs, publications, whatever in which neither the renaissance nor renaissance phenomena/artefacts/concepts/whatever are explicitly mentioned as such - although they should have been mentioned (at least according to at least one of the members of this forum here ...  Wink ... ).
 
Do take the "thumb down" icon with a grain  of salt ... .
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #1 - 26.03.2008 at 08:18:01
 
I received the following CFP via H-Ideas:
Quote:
Call for Papers

"Does the Past Matter? Renegotiating the Past, Communal
Identity, and Multiculturalism in Europe"
International Seminar
Moore Institute, National University of Ireland
Galway (Ireland)
13-14 November 2008

__________________________________________________


In our liquid second modernity, as Zygmunt Bauman declared,
amnesia has seemingly reached epidemic proportions.
Sociologists, cultural critics and historians warn us that
our modern society has severed the ties with the past in
order to inhabit the present and the future, and has
embraced a hodgepodge of ready-made identities, whilst
rejecting more traditional forms of identification. However,
it is not necessarily so. The past matters.

The question remains: how should we relate to national and
cultural histories while striving to create a new
multicultural Europe? Should we be advocates of Nietzschean
antiquarian or critical modes of relating to history? Or is
there a need for a more transgressive approach to history
that would allow creating a civic European platform?

The aim of this seminar is twofold. First, it aims to
address the issue of negotiating between past and present at
both local and national levels in Europe; secondly, to
investigate the influence of this enterprise on the
formation of progressive communal identities. The wide scope
of the conference is intended to be informed by a variety of
perspectives (cultural, political, ethical, religious and
social) from which the relationship between the past,
identity, and our perception of the ‘Other’ can be viewed.
Contributions from a variety of disciplines are welcome:
women and gender studies, literary and film studies,
political science, philosophy, sociology and history.
Proposals for interdisciplinary and comparative papers are
especially welcome. The main questions of the seminar are:

- Does the re-examination of the past contribute to the
cohesion or fragmentation of a community?
- How important is the recovery of the past for postcolonial
and post-totalitarian societies?
- Is reckoning with the past conducive to cultural
pluralism?
- Can renegotiation of the past contribute to the inclusion
of cultural, racial and political Others in Europe?
- What ethical considerations does this enterprise raise for
the project of multicultural Europe?
- In what ways does immigration influence our relationship
with the national past?

Keynote Speakers:
Dr Ronit Lentin (TCD, Ireland), second speaker to be confirmed

Proposals of up to 250 words for 20 minute duration papers
should be sent to Dr Kinga Olszewska. Accepted formats are
Word and PDF. Please include also the following information:
name, affiliation, contact details, and technical
requirements.
Abstract submission deadline is 31st of May 2008.
Paper acceptance notification will be sent out by the 20th
of June 2008.


Contact:

Dr Kinga Olszewska
Moore Institute
National University of Ireland
Galway
Ireland
Fax: +353 91 495507
Email: kinga.olszewska@nuigalway.ie
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #2 - 30.04.2008 at 09:44:26
 
At Heidelberg university this term they are having a series of lectures dedicated to magic, and as far as I can see: at least according to the titles of the talks: none of these lectures will be focussed on renaissance magic (nor on any (other) "philosophers' magic").  Sad
 
A press release concerning this lecture series can be found at http://idw-online.de/pages/de/news258059 .
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #3 - 05.06.2008 at 11:17:16
 
This CFP for a Canadfian conference on "Argument cultures" probably should also be pointed to in this thread here ... .
 
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #4 - 01.07.2008 at 17:04:53
 
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #5 - 14.07.2008 at 15:19:58
 
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #6 - 19.09.2008 at 08:26:47
 
The (rather longish) CFP for a conference with the title "Imagined Communities, Real Conflicts, and National Identities" ("14th Annual World Convention / Association for the Study of Nationalities (ASN)  / Harriman Institute, Columbia University / New York, NY (USA)  / 23-25 April 2009") which can be found at http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=H-Ideas&month=0809 &week=c&msg=Wrlk20sJxzeMzNVeFdc8Ug&user=&pw= IMO also qualifies for this thread here.
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #7 - 19.09.2008 at 08:37:48
 
And the programme for the Oxford, September 2nd conference on Religion, Atheism and the Community of Reason in Modernity which can be found at http://www.theology.ox.ac.uk/news_and_events/RACRIM.pdf seems to qualify for this thread too.
 


 
Found thanks to the pointer at http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=H-Ideas&month=0809 &week=c&msg=M7y/gddiAjdoHr/bG/k%2bQQ&user=&pw= .
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #8 - 17.11.2008 at 09:53:22
 
At http://idw-online.de/pages/de/event25401 you can find information about a Kolkata conference on Humanism in the Era of Globalization: Indian Insights which not only leaves me perplexed as to what is meant by "humanism" in that press release, but which only might classify for this thread here.  Wink
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #9 - 11.05.2009 at 10:53:37
 
I received the following text via H-IDEAS:
Quote:

Conference Announcement

"Intercultural Communication between China and the World:
Interpersonal, Organizational and Mediated Perspectives"
International Conference
China Association for Intercultural Communication (CAFIC)
International Association for Intercultural Communication
Studies (IAICS)
Association for Chinese Communication Studies (ACCS)
School of English and International Studies, Beijing Foreign
Studies University
Beijing (China)
11-14 June 2009

__________________________________________________


In the context of deepening globalization, China has
increasingly involved itself in full-scale cooperation with
the outside world and has now emerged as a member of the
international community with growing national power and a
rising international influence. Frequent contact and
communication with the world is crucial to China’s
development, and will surely encourage the intercultural
dialogue. However, cultural differences and discrepancies in
socio-economic development are now identified as major
obstacles to China’s communication with the world, and the
West in particular. Misunderstanding and stereotyping often
give rise to conflict and hostility.

Such a failure in communication, which permeates
interpersonal, organizational as well as mass-mediated
communication between China and the world, is a growing
concern among researchers of intercultural communication and
mass communication. Today China sees unprecedented levels of
scale and depth in its exchanges with the world, with
increasing cross-border cooperation carried out in the
fields of tourism, business, education, sports and cultural
activities, traditional mass communication and online
communication, etc. Such a large variety of intercultural
activities provide abundant opportunities for research into
intercultural communication/mass communication.

Hence the focus of this conference is on the intercultural
communication issues between China and the world observed
from interpersonal, organizational and mediated
perspectives. The conference aims to encourage a meeting of
theoretical and historical studies with empirical research,
to broaden the horizon of intercultural communication
studies and to contribute to the construction of a
harmonious world.

Topics

- Intercultural Communication
- Intercultural Mass Communication
- Cross-Cultural Studies

For a complete list please see:
http://www.uri.edu/iaics/conference/conf2009callforpaper.pdf

Accommodation

The conference will be held at the Foreign Language Teaching
and Research Press International Convention Center. Group
rate offered by the Hotel connected to the Convention Center
is 140 RMB per day (around US$ 20) double, and 100 RMB per
day (around US$ 15) single room of an apartment. The cost of
three meals a day in the hotel is 120 RMB per day (around
US$ 17).

The International Convention Center has already reserved
enough rooms for all participants from June 1st to the 20th.
Participants can pick a room and make the payment on the day
of registration. Please contact <cafic2009@gmail.com> with
any questions or concerns.

For further information about conference registration and
proceeding, please visit the conference website at:
http://cis.bfsu.edu.cn


Contact:

ZHANG Chunbo (Judy)
School of English and International Studies
Beijing Foreign Studies University
Xi San Huan Bei Lu, No. 2
Haidian
Beijing 100089
China
Tel: +86 (0)10 8881 6986
Fax: +86 (0)10 8881 6791
Email: cafic2009@gmail.com
Web: http://cis.bfsu.edu.cn
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned: De amicitia (SEP)
Reply #10 - 10.07.2009 at 10:43:54
 
Bennett Helm's 2009-07-09 SEP entry on Friendship also fits into this thread concerning items where I'd have Renaissance stuff to be mentioned, and such expectations were not met. If I_Ciceronis were a member of this forum here: she'd perhaps comment on the fact that Cicero isn't mentioned either.
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #11 - 19.10.2009 at 12:29:27
 
For a press release (in German) on 3 talks on "humanism" which apparently have no renaissance (co-)focus at all: see http://idw-online.de/pages/de/news339450 ('Reden über den Humanismus: Rüdiger Safranski spricht in Essen über "Mensch und Zeit"').
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #12 - 14.01.2010 at 10:19:59
 
The following CFP (received via H-Ideas) might probably be also be considered as apt for this thread:
Quote:
Call for Papers

PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE

An international congress on philosophical questions related to
literature and the study of literature, at the University of Vaasa,
Finland, 27-28 May 2010.

Plato, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche are classical examples of the
philosophers who discuss philosophical ideas with literary style.

Writers of world literature such as Dostoyevsky, Hesse, and Beauvoir, for
their part, are known as novelists whose books discuss philosophical
questions or are otherwise considered to be philosophical or profound.
These and many other examples from different countries and continents show
that literature can enrich and stimulate the discussion on philosophical
themes. Again, philosophical concepts and thematizations may offer tools
for literary research of literature. The goal of this conference is to
bring together philosophers and scholars of the study of literature to
discuss the aptness of literature in the discussion of philosophical
questions and the suitability of philosophical concepts and theories in
literary research.

The papers to be proposed can be case studies in which examples of
literature are discussed. The papers can also be theoretical studies that
aim to contribute to the theory of the study of literature or philosophy.

Some suggested questions and subtopics are the following:

Examples of the philosophical themes or questions discussed in world
literature by different authors from different periods

Examples of the approaches to philosophical themes or questions in literature

Which philosophical themes, fields (e.g., metaphysics, epistemology,
ethics, aesthetics) or questions are or have been especially apt to be
discussed in the forum of world literature? Why?

Which philosophical themes or questions are difficult to be discussed by
means of fiction? Why?

Which literary genres or types of novels are especially suitable to be
forums of philosophical discussion?

In what ways does philosophical imagination differ from fiction? In what
sense is imagination similar in philosophy and in fiction?

What special tools are available in literature to deal with philosophical
questions - tools that are lacking from standard academic philosophical
prose?

In what ways can philosophical tools (concepts, views, theories) be used
for the analysis of literature of different countries and cultures? In
what ways should philosophical tools not be used in literary research?

What philosophically interesting differences and similarities can be found
in the literature of different cultures and continents? Are the
differences related to philosophical themes and questions, or rather to
approaches or the ways of discussing?

What gender differences are there in male and female novelists' approaches
to philosophical questions? How do philosophically oriented novelists
discuss gender?

How have feminist philosophers treated issues relating to gender,
sexuality and embodiment in literary works? What kinds of
philosophical concepts or theoretical approaches can be productive from
the feminist perspective when studying the above mentioned questions in
literature?

Advisory Board: Thom Brook(UK),Kisor Chakrabarti(USA) Sanjukta
Dasgupta(India)Gordon Haist(USA), John Herold(USA), Linda B.
Elder(USA),Panos Eliopoulos(Greece) Sandra Fairbanks(USA),TiinaMäntymäki
(Finland),Keya Maitra(USA),Ming Shao(China),Joel Wilcox(USA)

Conference Directors:
Chandana Chakrabarti, Davis and Elkins College,USA
Tomi Lethonen, University of Vassa,Finland

Please send 150 words abstract by email to Panos Eliopoulos
ksatriya@tri.forthnet.gr by February 15, 2010.

Papers from the conference will be published subject to editorial review.

Single room 90 euros/night (normal price 124 euros)
Double room 109 euros/night (normal price 143 euros)

All rates include breakfastbuffet and value added tax.

Room reservations can be made by phone or by e-mail. When making the
reservation, please mention the quota name "Yliopisto".

Contact information:
Hotel Astor Vaasa
Address: Asemakatu 4, 65100 Vaasa, Finland
Phone: +35863269111
Fax: +35863269484
E-mail: astor@astorvaasa.fi
http://www.astorvaasa.fi/main.php?l=e&pid=1
<http://www.astorvaasa.fi/main.php?l=e&pid=1>



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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #13 - 14.01.2010 at 10:31:59
 
Quote from hck on 14.01.2010 at 10:19:59:
The following CFP (received via H-Ideas) might probably be also be considered as apt for this thread:
<...>

 
idem:
Quote:
CALL FOR PAPERS: TRANSLATION AND PHILOSOPHY



TRANSLATION AND PHILOSOPHY SYMPOSIUM – HUMANITIES INSTITUTE, UCD, 26TH AND
27TH MARCH 2010.



Papers are invited on the theme ‘Translation and Philosophy’ for a two day
symposium in March at University College Dublin.



The aim of the symposium is to explore the relationship between these two
disciplines and papers are welcome from across a range of disciplines
including, but not limited to: Translation Studies, Philosophy (both
Continental and Analytic), German, French and English Literature,
Linguistics and Intercultural Studies. Papers are particularly welcome
from graduate students working in relevant areas. Papers may focus on
some of the below questions, or on any aspect of the relationship between
these two traditions:



What is the nature of the relationship between translation and philosophy?
In their mutual search for meaning and greater understanding in what way
can they be said to be similar? What are their differences? With
philosophy, perhaps more than any other genre, translation is pushed to
the limits in an effort to carry across terms that are not existent in the
target language – words like différance, Geist, Dasein, to name but a few,
are common currency in the English speaking philosophical world, how does
this impact on English as a language in general? Could philosophy be said
to be a type of translation? Is translation itself philosophical? Given
that many of the great philosophical works are read in translation, to
what extent is philosophy dependent on translation? To what extent has
translation modified and re-invented the work of philosophers? From
Descartes to Ricoeur philosophy has often strived to provide a ‘theory of
translation’, what impact, if any, do these theories have on translation
in practice? Is there a ‘perfect’ translation?



Papers should be appropriate for a 20-30 minute presentation. Full paper
and abstracts (of 200-400 words) should be emailed to
lisa.foran@ucdconnect.ie no later than 26TH FEBRUARY 2010, please indicate
‘Translation and Philosophy Symposium’ in the subject line. Please
forward this CFP to those you think may be interested.


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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #14 - 29.01.2010 at 10:36:05
 
The following CFP (which I received via H-ideas) might also fit into this thread:
Quote:

Conference Announcement

"Poverty, Charity, Justice"
Interdisciplinary Conference
Wits Centre for Ethics and the Philosophy Department,
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg (South Africa)
12-14 March 2010

__________________________________________________


The Wits Centre for Ethics and the Philosophy Department invite you to
an interdisciplinary conference:
Poverty, Charity, Justice

Program

Friday March 12; Graduate Seminar Room, South West Engineering
Building

12:00-12:10 welcome

12:10-13:20 Thad Metz (UJ) Duties of Beneficence in the light of an
African Moral Theory

13:20-14:20 lunch

14:20-15:30 Gerald Lang (Leeds) Justice and National Boundaries

15:30-16:00 tea and coffee

16:00-17:30 Tommie Shelby (Harvard) Justice, Self-Respect and the
Culture of Poverty


Saturday March 13; Central Block 08

09:00-10:10 Lucy Allais (Wits) Should I give to beggars?

10:20-11:30 Pedro Tabensky (Rhodes) The Oppressor's Pathology

11:30-12:00 tea and coffee

12:00-13:10 Lawrence Hamilton (UJ) Freedom, Power and Poverty

13:10-14:10 lunch

14:10-15:20 Daryl Glaser (Wits) Class as a Normative Category:
Egalitarian Reasons to take it seriously (with a South African case
study)

15:20-15:50 tea and coffee

15:50-17:00 Hennie Lotter (UJ) Justice as Poverty Prevention


Sunday March 14 Central Block 08

09:00-10:10 David Bilchitz (Saifac) Defining the Positive Obligations
of Corporations in relation to fundamental rights: A question of
charity or justice?

10:20-11:30 Ward Jones (Rhodes) TBA

11:30-12:00 tea and coffee

12:00-13:10 Helga Varden (Illinois) A Kantian Conception of Domestic
Economic Justice

13:10-14:00 lunch

14:00-15:10 Luigi Caranti (Catania) Pogge's Causal Analysis of Global
Poverty. Some Critical Remarks

15:10-15:40 tea and coffee

15:40-17:00 Thomas Pogge (Yale, Oslo, ANU) Poverty and Justice


Please inform <Yhesmien.Hill@wits.ac.za> if you intend to attend.
A campus map can be found at: http://web.wits.ac.za/ContactWits/Maps/
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #15 - 29.01.2010 at 15:21:47
 
And an other item (this one received via SHARP-L):
Quote:

***We can now confirm that a limited number of postgraduate travel bursaries
will be available to students submitting the best abstracts, as judged by the
BSANZ2010 organising committee.  Please indicate when submitting your abstract
that you wish to be considered for a travel bursary.  If you have already
submitted an abstract and wish to be considered for a student bursary, please
advise the BSANZ 2010 organising committee via the conference email address***:
BSANZ2010@arts.monash.edu.au





FINAL CFP - TO DEPRAVE AND CORRUPT: FORBIDDEN, HIDDEN AND CENSORED BOOKS



The Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing & Ideas, State Library of Victoria
(centrepiece of Melbourne's successful UNESCO City of Literature bid) &
The Centre for the Book, Monash University,

Melbourne, Australia

14-16 July 2010



*  Manuscript, Print and Digital Publications

*  Legal, Religious and Cultural Prohibitions

*  Histories, Modes and Strategies of Textual Censorship and Subversion

*  Immoral, Blasphemous and Seditious Books

*  Clandestine and Self-publication, Underground Distribution and Resistant
Archiving

*  The Cultural Politics of Editing, Publishing, Retailing and Cataloguing



Keynote speakers will include:
Prof. Jenny Hocking (Monash University), author of Frank Hardy: Politics
Literature Life (2005) and Terror Laws: ASIO, Counter-terrorism and the
Threat to Democracy (2004)





Books have long attracted an array of legal, religious and cultural
prohibitions.



Most spectacularly, specific books have been decried, seized and publicly
destroyed by state and religious institutions. Liberal-minded scholars have
tended to focus on the trials surrounding celebrated books, from Lady
Chatterley's Lover (1928) to Spycatcher (1987), as unjustifiable encroachments
on authorial free speech. Likewise, there is a long history of conflict over the
availability and matter of children's and young adult literature, with schools
and libraries regularly responding to public debates on moral, social and
political content, including campaigns over allegedly sexist and racist content
in Enid Blyton's work and occult themes in the Harry Potter (1999-2007) and
Twilight (2005-8) series.  The status, content and possible influence of comics
and graphic novels remain a lightning-rod for deep-seated cultural anxieties, in
both children's and adult markets.  But 21st-century prohibitions also extend
well beyond fiction genres, with anti-terrorism legislation and bans on
euthanasia criminalising possession and sale of specific 'how-to' handbooks, or
even their consultation in academic research libraries.



More pervasively, books have been subject to textual interventions that
effect censorship by comparatively subtle means, through omissions,
excisions and selective glossing, the creation of 'school' and 'family'
editions, and by the addition of tendentious paratextual apparatus. There is
also a wide variety of mechanisms by which certain books become hidden-by
denying state cultural subsidies to the authors of 'unfashionable' subjects,
allowing texts to drop out of print, remain un-reviewed or academically
neglected. Publishers, librarians and readers may themselves actively collude in
such obscuring practices: through misleading cover-designs and blurbs, skewed
marketing and publicity campaigns, inaccurate cataloguing, creating restrictive
'closed collections', or through the deliberate mis-shelving of books by library
patrons.



But in a world of textual abundance, and with the growing penetration of
algorithmic search-engines, can any book remain hidden for long? As the
legal jurisdiction of the nation-state struggles to combat piracy and
grass-roots file-sharing, as individual activist and corporate mass-scanning
projects deliver prohibited texts virtually, and online book retailers offer an
ever-growing 'long tail' of globally-sourced book titles, strategies for both
prohibiting and evading prohibition are clearly in a critical state of flux.



The Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand, The Centre for the
Book at Monash University, and The Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas
at The State Library of Victoria invite proposals considering examples of
forbidden, hidden and censored books (conceived broadly) and the issues that
stem from them.



Abstracts are sought for both individual papers (20 minutes) and themed
panel sessions (3 x 20 minute papers).  Please email prospective paper
titles, 300-word proposals and 50-word presenter bio-notes by Friday 26
February 2010 to the conference organisers at: BSANZ2010@arts.monash.edu.au





)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

Dr Simone Murray

Senior Lecturer in Communications and Media Studies

& Director, The Centre for the Book

School of English, Communications & Performance Studies

Monash University

Clayton VIC 3800, AUSTRALIA



Email: Simone.Murray@arts.monash.edu.au

Tel. +61 (0)3 9905 2220

Fax. +61 (0)3 9905 2135

http://arts.monash.edu.au/ecps/communications/staff/simone-murray/

((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((

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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #16 - 02.02.2010 at 16:51:37
 
An other item:
Christof Rapp:
Aristotle's Rhetoric
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
"First published Thu May 2, 2002; substantive revision Mon Feb 1, 2010"

 
Quote:
Not only authors writing in the peripatetic tradition, but also the famous Roman teachers of rhetoric, such as Cicero and Quintilian, frequently used elements stemming from the Aristotelian doctrine. Nevertheless, these authors were interested neither in an authentic interpretation of the Aristotelian works nor in the philosophical sources and backgrounds of the vocabulary that Aristotle had introduced to rhetorical theory. Thus, for two millennia the interpretation of Aristotelian rhetoric has become a matter of the history of rhetoric, not of philosophy.

 


 
(

  • Riccobonus: Rhetorica (1595)
  • Cyprianus Soarez: De Arte Rhetorica libri tres ex Aristotele, Cicerone & Quintiliano praecipue deprompti (1573)
  • Gozzi, Niccolò Vito di (1549-1610, = Nikola Gučetić): In primum librum 'Artis rhetoricorum Aristotelis' commentaria  
  • Ericus Mullerus: Eisagōgē In Rhetorica, potißimum Aristotelis (1643)
  • Ingolstetter, Johann: Isagoge In Rhetoricam Aristotelis, Hoc est, Praecepta Eloquentiae Methodica: Ex utilissimis & sapientissimis trib, de arte Rhetorica ad Theodecten libris aristotelis excerpta (1602)
  • Antonius Maioragius: In tres Aristotelis libros de Arte Rhetorica quos ipse latinos fecit explanationes (1571)
  • Martini Borrhai Stutgardiani in tres Aristotelis de arte dicendi libros commentaria (1551)
  • &c.

      )
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #17 - 09.03.2010 at 10:24:50
 
The following CfP (which I received via H-Ideas) seems also to fit into his thread (although "Theoretical, historical and (inter)cultural perspectives on rhetoric" are mentioned):
Quote:
Cfp: "Rhetoric in Society III," Department of Applied Language Studies,
Lessius University College, Antwerpen, Belgium, January 26-28, 2011.

Posted: 05 Mar 2010 08:59 AM PST
Keynote Speakers:

Gunther Kress
Christopher W. Tindale
Jef Verschueren

Rethinking Rhetoric:

Since Aristotle, the study of rhetoric has focused on the persuasive
aspect of discourse in the political, forensic, and ceremonial domains.
Rhetoric deals with doxa, the shared opinions and reasons people consider
plausible and acceptable in a specific situation. It involves decisions
taken by participants in public discourse on the basis of common
deliberation and free choice in domains in which there can be no absolute
truth, e.g. as in social and political life. Nowadays, we have come to
realize the importance of rhetoric in all forms of discourse. There is no
communication without some form of rhetoric.

Rhetoricians examine how people use arguments and language in order to
convince or persuade an audience. But there is a lot more to rhetoric than
that. It comprises more than sets of advice; in fact it is an art. It is
the art of discovering what is persuasive in a given situation. This
inventiveness points to how rhetoric has a heuristic function as well. It
appeals to our creativity in our search for relevant questions and answers
to specific matters. And as our discourse and arguments develop in
interaction with other discourses (Voloshinov / Bakhtin), the hermeneutic
aspect of rhetoric should not be overlooked. There is no rhetoric without
analysis, interpretation and theoretical reflection. The art of speaking
and writing “well” can be considered a cornerstone of our cultures and our
educational systems.

Interdisciplinary Research:

The conference Rhetoric in Society aims to present and discuss different
approaches to rhetoric. It will address this basic question: in what ways
can the study of rhetoric function and provide an insight into our
postmodern world? Consequently, what can it claim about discourse in the
public domain, how is it related to empirical sciences, what can it say
about the ever increasing amount of information and opinion that pervades
our lives? Conversely, it can also be asked in what way actual language
and communication theories and disciplines draw on ancient rhetoric.

Contributions to the conference will cover a wide range of both themes and
theories. They will cover a broad spectrum of academic fields and thus
favour interdisciplinary research not only within the fields of rhetoric,
rhetorical criticism, rhetorical citizenship, argumentation studies,
pragmatics, critical discourse studies, text linguistics, art and
literature, but also the fields of communication studies, journalism
studies, political, social and educational studies, history and
philosophy.

We welcome papers or panel proposals on the role of rhetoric and
argumentation in written and oral discourse and genres, on topics such as:
public deliberation, controversies, legal decision-making, spin,
hyphenated writing, social change, political campaigning, social
movements, public relations, publicity, advertising, management, corporate
internal communication, art and literature, visual rhetoric and public
media discourse.

The core themes of the conference are:

Rhetoric in journalism and new media
Rhetoric in political discourse
Rhetoric in organizational discourse
Rhetoric in legal discourse
Rhetoric in education
Rhetoric in visual communication
Theoretical, historical and (inter)cultural perspectives on rhetoric

Visit the conference website here: http://www.lessius.eu/tt/ris/.

* Please send your abstract of max. 300 words edited in MS Word or PDF
to RIS3@lessius.eu.
* The abstract should include a title, a research question, an
indication of the theoretical framework, at least three
bibliographical references, methodology, results and conclusion. The
academic committee will review the abstracts (blind reviewing).
* Deadline for abstracts is June 30th 2010, 12 a.m. Central European
time.
* All contributions should be presented in English only.
* Please mention in your abstract the conference theme(s) within which
you wish to present your paper.
* Please put your name in the subject of your mail, and your further
references in the mail message (affiliation, university or
institution, e-mail, phone number, most important publications on the
topic if possible, and the title of your paper).
* Notification of acceptance will be sent before September 15th 2010.




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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #18 - 08.09.2010 at 14:43:48
 
George Karamanolis: Plutarch (SEP, 2010-09-07): section "8. Influence" : sounds as if Plutarch was little read between ancient times and the 20th century.
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #19 - 15.09.2010 at 11:44:23
 
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Re: Renaissance not mentioned
Reply #20 - 15.09.2011 at 16:11:14
 
The "Renaissance" is mentioned in the following item, but only briefly, and without any allusion to the fact that there are various concepts of "Renaissance humanism" (no, I did not expect them to mention that there are people who doubt that "renaissance humanism" is a very, well, useful concept).
 
From H-Ideas:
 
Quote:



Call for Papers

Theme: Rethinking Humanism
Type: International Conference
Institution: Institute of European Cultural Identity Studies and
Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies, University of St Andrews
Location: St Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom)
Date: 28.6.–1.7.2012
Deadline: 15.12.2011

__________________________________________________


The term "humanism" has been used with a variety of meanings and
associated with some significant moments in intellectual history.
Traceable to ancient times in Protagoras' "Man is the measure of all
things" and central to the renewal enterprise of the Renaissance and
to the optimism of the Enlightenment, it was popularised during the
nineteenth century and reached its contemporary peak with
existentialism in the twentieth. In its widest sense of a discourse
that speaks for all of humanity, for "being human" and for
"human-centredness", it has now been in crisis for several decades,
accused of exhibiting a range of biases in areas that include gender,
race and ethnicity as well as haughtiness about the place of humans
in the greater scheme of nature. Its correlates in politics and
economics have also suffered significant attacks from critics of
liberalism and capitalism. The crisis of the humanist project has
been highlighted in recent years through new coinages such as
transhumanism and posthumanism. Still, for some thinkers humanism
continues to be the best form of speaking about humankind in general
terms, whilst granting that the criticisms must be taken on board.
The alternatives, it is argued, seem to lead into a fragmentarism
which prevents us from seeing the human wood for the subcultural
trees.

The aim of the conference is to problematize the representation of
human values, identities and behaviours in literature, film and other
cultural products, from Antiquity to the present day. We call for
theoretical accounts of the origins and vicissitudes of an aspiration
for a universal discourse as well as critical readings of its
variegated realisations in texts across European languages and
periods. We also seek textual and theoretical investigations into
current ideas about being human, so we summon specialists in
eco-criticism, post-human aesthetics and cyborg literature as well as
anthropologists, philosophers, theologians and psychologists, on
problems such as self-knowledge, cultural and national identity,
human nature, moral universalism and relativism, and the longevity or
precarious status of values such as community, hospitality, dignity,
modesty and conversation. An ultimate achievement of this
interdisciplinary gathering may well turn out to be catching a
glimpse of a revived, more self-conscious, more sensitive and more
durable New Humanism.

Abstract paper proposals to the relevant convener by 15 December
2011; response will be given by 15 February 2012

Keynote speakers:

Martha Nussbaum
Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the
University of Chicago

Terry Eagleton
Distinguished Professor in English Literature at the Department of
English & Creative Writing at Lancaster University

Organisers:

Dr Gustavo San Román, Director
Institute of European Cultural Identity Studies
Email: gfsr@st-andrews.ac.uk

Professor Nigel Rapport, Director
Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies, Department of Social Anthropology
Email: njr2@st-andrews.ac.uk

Conference website:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/Research/Centresandinstitutes/IECIS/Forthco mingConference/

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