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Periodisations, borders (Read 50621 times)
hck
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Periodisations, borders
03.06.2008 at 09:50:46
 
This is not meant to attack any preferences. This is not intended as a stance on "renaissance" vs. "early modern". This is just meant for documentation, and perhaps for documentation as a basis for discussion.  
 
The reason (or perhaps better the occasion) is that we might see a shift of the borders of the period wherein most of the texts we are writing about where written, the period wherein most of the phenomena we write about did have their basis, etc.. Or we might not.
 
  • For Michelet it's renaissance, and it's 1483 through the 16th century, roughly.
  • For Buckhardt it's "renaissance, and it's roughly ca. 1220 to ca. 1525/1550.
  • The the former library of our institution used to assign "renaissance" shelfmarks to books by/on authors from Dante (incl.) to Descartes (excl.), but with Occam treated as "mediaeval" and Vico treated as "rinascimental"; and Cusanus was once shelved as "mediaeval" and then reshelved to "rinascimental".  (Yes, it's "Seminar für Geistesgeschichte und Philosophie der Renaissance".) On might consider this asx either an approach trying to incoporate somehow several approaches, definitions and concepts, or as utter chaos ... .
  • In 1998 I myself went for ca. 1348 (the Great Plague) to ca. 1648 (Thirty Years War) and Renaissance.
  • The English Wikipedia seems to prefer to treat "renaissance" and "early modern" as rather equivalent, and says it happened in the 14th through 17th centuries.
  • The German version of Wikipedia goes for "renaissance" and the 14th through 16th centuries. In this (and almost only this) respect more or less the same are the choices of the Italian variant.
  • Sharon Howard at http://earlymodernweb.org.uk/emr/ useses "early modern" and ca. 1500-1800. As far as I can see: that's a periodisation used in many many cases where "early modern" is preferred.
  • This CFP for a GEMCS 2008 panel on "drinking and gender in early modern culture" uses 1450 to 1850 as the borders ("Papers from any discipline and focusing on any time periodbetween 1450 and 1850 are welcome.") (It was this CFP which incited me to write this posting here.)

 
Perhaps one should build a database with these and many many other examples, and then try to plot some sort of graphic condensation. Or perhaps such a thing has already been done? Any pointers by anyone?
 
Anyway: I'll use this thread here whenever I find any new periodisation statements or examples which seem to be interesting to me.
Feel free and invited to do so as well.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #1 - 04.06.2008 at 09:19:58
 
The CFP which can be found here has "early modern" and  1400 to 1800. (I.e.: a rather early start of the period for a text that uses "early modern" and not "renaissance".)
 
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Reply #2 - 09.07.2008 at 10:55:24
 
In this CFP (To Have and To Hold:  Marriage in Pre-Modern Europe 1200-1700)  however we obviously have "modernity" start in 1700, so that the whole "renaissance" in the borders preferred by me (ca. 1348 to ca. 1648) would not be "early modern" but just "pre-modern".
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Reply #3 - 11.07.2008 at 11:25:19
 
At http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/07/05/arts/conway.php (continued at http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/07/05/arts/conway.php?page=2 ) you can find an International Herald Tribune 2008-07-04 article by Roderick Conway Morris: "Under Frederick II, the first rebirth of Roman culture" which (without quoting Burckhardt) has the Renaissance start with (and at least somewhat started by) emperor Fridericus II.
 


Found thanks to http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=H-HRE&month=0807&a mp;week=b&msg=F/En7DUl8EjBcDEg1UQG3A&user=&pw=
 


ETA: The website of the exhibition "Exempla. La rinascita dell'antico nell'arte italiana. Da Federico II ad Andrea Pisano" can be found at http://www.mostraexempla.it/
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Reply #4 - 03.09.2008 at 12:29:42
 
Cliopatria's Appendices has under the heading "Pre-Modern History"  i.a. links to blogs with the following titles:  
- 18th Century Blog
- 18th c. Cuisine
- 18th Century Historical Trekking
-  Early Modern News
-  Early Modern Notes
-  Early Modern Rambler
-  Early Modern Whale
-  The Long Eighteenth
 
Near the end there is the following:
Quote:
Caveat Lector: Categories are an abstraction. Many blogs do not categorize well. We've done the best we can. Neither category, order or position are intended as value or quality judgements.

 


 
Found thanks to http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/?p=175 .
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Reply #5 - 05.09.2008 at 14:37:53
 
This one here is from German Gerrman philology: at the Berlin 2008-10-11 conference with the title Neue Perspektiven der Mittelalterrezeption there will be the following talks:
  • Quote:
    Johannes Klaus Kipf (München):
    Wann beginnt im deutschen Sprachraum die Mittelalterrezeption?
    Vergleichende Beobachtungen zu lateinischen und volkssprachigen Rezeptionsweisen
    mittelalterlicher Literatur (ca. 1450–1600)

     
     
    (which might imply that post mediaeval times started in 1450)
  • Quote:
    Norbert Kössinger (München):
    Deutsche Texte des Frühmittelalters in der frühen Neuzeit. Zu einigen Voraussetzungen
    für eine Geschichte der philologischen Mittelalterrezeption vom 16.
    - 18. Jahrhundert

    (ca. 1500 as the starting date of post-mediaeval times?)

 
The conference program can be found at http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/Download/mittelalterrezeptionstagu ng.pdf . (Found via http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/lehrende/chronik/2008/we4_tagung_m ittelalterrezeption.html .)
 
See also the press release at http://idw-online.de/pages/de/news276771 (which first pointed me to this conference.)
 
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Reply #6 - 16.09.2008 at 12:16:21
 
The job ad at http://www.h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=37236 (Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Early Modern Studies, "Art History, English, or History") seeks somebody specialised in "the period from c. 1600 to c. 1800".
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Reply #7 - 01.10.2008 at 17:11:07
 
The CFP for the San José 2009 conference Shifting Paradigms in Early Modern Studies i.a. asks the question Quote:
Does “Early Modern” have a significantly different meaning
from “Renaissance”?
.
 
If anyone amongst you, the readers of this forum, should be able to find out whether (and if yes: how) this question will be or was answered at said conference: please let me/us know about it. Thanks in advance!
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Reply #8 - 28.10.2008 at 10:40:57
 
This CFP has the following phrase: "pre- and early modern periods (up to ca.1820)",
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Reply #9 - 05.12.2008 at 09:42:32
 
John Culp's SEP enty on Panentheism (2008-12-04(/05)) uses a rather "extended" concept of the middle ages:
Quote:
In the Middle Ages, the influence of Neoplatonism continued in the thought of Eriugena (815–877), Eckhart (1260–1328), Nicholas of Cusa (1401–1464), and Boehme (1575–1624).

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Reply #10 - 14.01.2009 at 10:03:23
 
The item pointed to here might be an example of the "middle ages" ending in 1550.
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Reply #11 - 28.01.2009 at 09:22:28
 
H-Soz-u-Kult flagged this review of a 1517/18 text with "MA" (for middle ages).
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Reply #12 - 28.01.2009 at 13:25:51
 
The organisers of the Oxford conference on Social Cohesion in Pre-Modern England, 1500-1800 seem to consider 1700 as the end of the "early modern" period, as they write:
Quote:
Models for conceptualizing the social order in the historiographies of early modern and eighteenth-century England

(bolding mine)
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Reply #13 - 11.02.2009 at 14:01:05
 
This CFP for a Canterbury conference on Reading and Writing in Renaissance Society 1400-1700 obviously assumes that both the years 1400 and 1700 belong to the "Renaissance".
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Reply #14 - 17.02.2009 at 09:15:03
 
The title of the book reviewed here uses "Early Modern" for the time between 1400 and 1800.
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Reply #15 - 18.02.2009 at 10:27:49
 
This CFP for a Dublin June 2009 confernce with the title Continuities: From “Medieval” to “Early Modern” in English Literature (1400-1650) addresses the question of periodisation:
Quote:
‘Early modernists’ have begun to question the term ‘renaissance’ (with its associations of value and teleology) in order to envision the period of artistic achievement as one which began long before the emergence of Shakespeare.

...
Quote:
interrogating the terms ‘medieval’/‘renaissance’/‘early modern’; the renaissance ‘canon’.

 
 
The conference website is at http://continuitiesconference.blogspot.com/ .
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Reply #16 - 04.03.2009 at 10:06:23
 
The item reviewed at http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/id=11779&count=7504& recno=1&type=rezbuecher&sort=datum&order=down has "Frühneuzeit" (early modern) for the period 1500-1800.
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Reply #17 - 16.03.2009 at 16:58:54
 
This CFP (which is focussed on Rome) uses "early modern" for the time between 1341 and 1667.
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Reply #18 - 16.03.2009 at 17:01:59
 
Quote from hck on 16.03.2009 at 16:58:54:
This CFP (which is focussed on Rome) uses "early modern" for the time between 1341 and 1667.

 
I found this especially remarkable, as I myself do use ore or less the same temporal borders when going hunting for items of potential professional interest to me (ca. 1348 to ca. 1648: Great Plague to Peace of Westphalia), although I use "Renaissance" as a tag for that period.
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Reply #19 - 17.03.2009 at 11:58:21
 
The 2009-02-18 review by Ferdinand Mount at http://www.spectator.co.uk/books/3367371/how-different-from-us.thtml has the following:
Quote:
The odd thing is that, as Thomas points out, nobody seems quite sure when ‘Early Modern’ begins or ends. Suggested starting dates range between 1300 and 1560, and the end date may be fixed anywhere between 1660 and 1800 — or even later. On the web, I spotted a conference advertised in Oklahoma on ‘Early Modern Culture 1492-1848’. At the other end, Professor Colin Morris places ‘the discovery of the individual’ somewhere near the beginning of the 12th century. So that makes about 700 years in which our ancestors were trying to get up to speed.

 
 


 
Found thanks to http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/03/04/the-ends-of-life-new-book-by-keith- thomas/ .
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Reply #20 - 18.03.2009 at 13:29:38
 
This text, which I received via H-HRE has 1100 to 1800 for "early  modernities":
Quote:
Conference Announcement


Comparative Early Modernities: 1100-1800

Hussey Room
Michigan League
University of Michigan
April 17-18, 2009


Featuring conversations among twelve leading scholars of early modern
Asia, Europe, and South America, this interdisciplinary conference will
showcase novel comparative perspectives in the fields of literary, social,
art, and economic history and re-examine the theoretical and
methodological premises of comparative historical studies.


Program:

April 17th - Day 1

9:15 - 11:30 am Session I: Globalizing Early Modernity
Walter Cohen (Cornell University), "Out of India: Global Early Modernity"
Ayesha Ramachandran (SUNY Stony Brook), "A War of Worlds: Becoming 'Early
Modern' and the Challenge of Comparison"

1:00 - 3:15 pm Session II: Writing Across Worlds
Luke Clossey (Simon Fraser University), "Did Aurangzeb Write Tom Jones?
Eurocentrism and Writing the Early Modern World"
Su Fang Ng (University of Oklahoma), "Dutch Wars, Global Trade, and the
Heroic Poem: Dryden's 'Annus Mirabilis' (1666) and Amin's 'Syair Perang
Mengkasar' (1670)"

3:30 - 5:45 pm Session III: Comparative Cultural History
Claudia Brosseder (University of Heidelberg), "Magic in Comparative
Perspective: Early Modern Europe and Colonial Latin America"
Richard Vinograd (Stanford University), "Accommodating Incompatibilities
in Early Visual Modernity"


April 18th - Day 2

9:15 - 11:30 am Session I: Region and Tradition
Jack Goldstone (George Mason University), "Cultural Trajectories: The
Power of the Traditional within the Early Modern"
Kenneth Pomeranz (UC Irvine), "Areas, Networks, and the Search for 'Early
Modern' East Asia"

1:00 - 3:15 pm Session V: Family and Sexuality
Katherine Carlitz (University of Pittsburgh), "Pornography, Chastity, and
'Early Modernity' in China, England, and France"
Ann Waltner (University of Minnesota), "Comparing Family Histories in the
Early Modern Period: The View from China"

3:30 - 5:45 pm Session VI: Comparative Historiography
Gregory Blue (University of Victoria), "The Rise and Fall of Enlightenment
Sinophilia: Did Political Economy Lead the Way?"
R. Bin Wong (UC Los Angeles), "Did China's Late Empire have an Early
Modern Era?"


REGISTRATION:

Seating at this event will be limited and pre-registration is strongly
recommended.

UM Faculty and Students - Send an email to
gelsevents@umich.edu<mailto:gelsevents@umich.edu> to register.

Visitors - Register online at: http://conferences.housing.umich.edu/cemc


LOGISTICS:

For further details about this event, including information on hotels and
transportation, please visit Our conference website is
http://www.umich.edu/~cemc<http://www.umich.edu/%7Ecemc> , email
gelsevents@umich.edu<mailto:gelsevents@umich.edu>, or call 734-647-4893.
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Reply #21 - 25.03.2009 at 09:44:28
 
The CFP at http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/32501 has 1500 as either the end or part of the middle ages.
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Reply #22 - 22.04.2009 at 10:05:01
 
A Munich lecture series might discuss some of the aspects of the periodisations concerning and borders of "our" period.
 
See the press release and the introduiction plus programme.
 
The programme uses only "early modern" and according to the press release it is about the 15th through 17th century.
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Reply #23 - 22.04.2009 at 10:14:54
 
http://www1.spiegel.de/active/quiztool/fcgi/quiztool.fcgi?id=39380&a=4 offers for the end of the middle ages:
Quote:
Der Wissenstest in Geschichte

Frage 2 von 36

Wann ungefähr endete das Mittelalter?

* 15. Jahrhundert
* 18. Jahrhundert
* Mit den Kreuzzügen
* Mit der Völkerwanderung

 
By taking the test I found out that they want "15th cent." as the "correct" answer, and in their corrolarium they write i.a.:
Quote:
Der Begriff des Mittelalters hat sich in der Folgezeit dann als Epochenbegriff mit tendenziell abwertender Bedeutung etabliert, wobei die Epochengrenzen meist einerseits mit dem Ende des Weströmischen Reiches im Jahr 476 und andererseits mit der Eroberung Konstantinopels im Jahr 1453 durch die Osmanen angesetzt wurde, letzteres speziell im Hinblick darauf, dass byzantinische Gelehrte bei ihrer Flucht in den Westen wichtige griechische Handschriften mitbrachten, die dem lateinischen Mittelalter unbekannt geblieben oder nur durch arabische Übersetzungen bekannt geworden waren.

and
Quote:
Die Bezeichnung „Mittelalter“ bezieht sich in erster Linie auf die Geschichte des christlichen Abendlands vor der Reformation, denn der Begriff wird kaum im Zusammenhang mit außereuropäischen Kulturen verwendet. Im Groben ordnet man das Mittelalter in die Zeit von 500 bzw. 600 n. Chr. bis etwa 1500 ein. Wesentlich konkreter sind jedoch folgende Bezugsdaten:

Das Mittelalter erstreckt sich ungefähr vom Ende der Völkerwanderung (375–568) bzw. vom Untergang des weströmischen Kaisertums 476 bis zum Zeitalter der Renaissance seit der Mitte des 15. Jahrhunderts bzw. bis zum Beginn des 16. Jahrhunderts (bezüglich der Problematik der Datierung des Beginns des Mittelalters siehe Ende der Antike und Spätantike).

Die Datierungen sind nicht immer einheitlich, es kommt oft darauf an, welche Aspekte der Entwicklung bevorzugt werden und von welchem Land man ausgeht. Stellt man zum Beispiel den Einfluss des Islam in den Vordergrund, kann man Mohammeds Hidschra (622) oder den Beginn der arabischen Expansion ab 632 als Beginn sehen. Ebenso gibt es unterschiedliche Datierungsmöglichkeiten für das Ende des Mittelalters, beispielsweise die Erfindung des Buchdrucks (um 1450), die Eroberung von Konstantinopel 1453, die Entdeckung Amerikas 1492 oder auch der Beginn der Reformation (1517). Fokussiert man einzelne Länder, so kann man auch zu verschiedenen Eckdaten kommen. So endete die Antike am Rhein oder in Britannien aufgrund der dortigen Entwicklungen während der Völkerwanderung sicher früher als etwa in Syrien. Auf der anderen Seite war zum Beispiel zu Beginn des 15. Jahrhunderts in Italien bereits das Zeitalter der Renaissance angebrochen, während man zur gleichen Zeit in England noch vom Mittelalter spricht.
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Reply #24 - 27.04.2009 at 09:22:12
 
Stephen H. Daniel's The Early Modern Philosophy Calendar has "late 16th, 17th, and 18th century" as "early modern".
 


 
Found thanks to http://twitter.com/charlesnodier .
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