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Periodisations, borders (Read 113442 times)
prblum
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #100 - 22.08.2013 at 02:08:44
 
Note:
Flasch, Kurt. Das philosophische Denken im Mittelalter: von Augustin zu Machiavelli. Stuttgart: P. Reclam, 1986.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #101 - 17.09.2013 at 10:33:49
 
Quote from prblum on 22.08.2013 at 02:08:44:
Note:
Flasch, Kurt. Das philosophische Denken im Mittelalter: von Augustin zu Machiavelli. Stuttgart: P. Reclam, 1986.

 
Yep. And then there's of course Frederick Copleston's classic Augustine to Scotus for "the Middle Ages" and Ockham to Suarez (p. vii of the 1985 reprint of the 1962/1963 edition C. calls Occam "the last great English philosopher of the Middle Ages", p. 18 he talks about "Renaissance philosophy").  
 


 
re: Copleton's "English philosopher":
(Periodisations and chronological borders are already a can of worms. If somebody should want to discuss geographical, political, and/or "religious"/"confessional" borders <some of you know that I myself talk about religious orders and "communities in rites/in ritibus" when talking about the period(s) we are concerned with, and consider talking about religions and/or "confessional" entities as not exactly useful for anything but pretending to explain phenomena although one is not able to grasp them; no, you don't have to agree; no, I don't expect most of you to agree>, anyway:  If you should want to discuss geographical, political, and/or "religious"/"confessional" borders in this forum here: all of you members of this forum are certainly welcome to do so, but, as IMO these are not the same can of worms the question of chronological borders is: I'd suggest that you create one or several new threads for that.)
 


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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #102 - 14.10.2013 at 16:34:47
 
This item here somheow fits into this thread here, and somehow it doesn't fit:
 
Denley, Peter:
‘Medieval’, ‘Renaissance’, ‘modern’. Issues of periodization in  Italian university history
in: "Renaissance Studies" 27.4 (2013), pp. 487-503
(2013-09-11)

 
Quote:
Abstract:
Italian university historiography is strongly influenced by current notions of periodization and change. ‘Medieval’ universities have been seen as unique but soon outdated creations, to be overtaken by ‘Renaissance’ universities in which the driving forces were the requirements of ‘princes’ or whoever else was at the helm of the ‘territorial state’. The ‘Renaissance’ universities, and even more their ‘modern’ successors, are supposed to have been more functional, more responsive to demand and to the aspirations of rulers and elites – and thus, by implication, more ‘efficient’. But this reading fails to take full cognisance of the true significance of the medieval universities, which in practice were strongly pragmatic foundations as well as idealistic ones. From the thirteenth century, Italian universities in particular were locked in a mechanism of market forces that ensured that they were constantly open to fresh initiatives and constantly subject to change. This contribution reassesses these institutions and contests the traditional chronological perspectives.

 
From the article itself:
Quote:
Italian writers on university history have largely followed the trend of the last generation or so which has re-periodized the Renaissance, pushing the ‘early modern’ period back by a century or so, and focusing on the growth of ‘the Renaissance state’ as a key development.9 The standard view has a landmark date, 1361, the year in which Galeazzo II Visconti founded the University of Pavia: a ‘despot’ creating a university that would be subject to his whim and will, and doing so not in his own capital but in a subject town, while of course ensuring that all but the most trivial decisions regarding it were taken not in Pavia but in Milan. The idea that this constituted the beginning of a new approach is enhanced by events of 1405–06, when Venice, conquering Padua, took over what was effectively the peninsula's second studio and formalized its role as the official university of the republic, also choosing to rule it from the capital. A third decision, that of Lorenzo de' Medici to transfer the hitherto modest studio of Florence to Pisa in 1472–73, ‘parachuting’ it into a declining subject city (to use Piero Del Negro's fortunate expression),10 and re-launching it there while yet again retaining control from the centre, completed the trend. With this move, all three of the major territorial states of northern/central Italy had, by different routes, arrived at the same model of universities at arm's length from the metropolis, in subject towns with their own strong local significance and civic identities.11 Alongside this pattern, one could add the point that the other two main new studi of the period were instituted and governed by princes; the University of Ferrara, which opened briefly in 1391 but had to be refounded in 1442, again very much under the control of the Este,12 and that of Turin, founded in 1404 as the university for Savoy and run largely by its count.13

<...>
Quote:
Though Pavia is credited with the introduction of the famous protectionist measures whereby subjects of the state were not allowed to attend a university outside the territory, and students and teachers were forbidden to leave for another centre, it was in fact not the first studio to have this stipulation. Frederick II had made the same provision when he founded the University of Naples in 1224, and although its peculiar situation and the discontinuities of its history might incline one to dismiss this as exceptional, it is harder to ignore another example, closer in time and place; in terms of protectionist legislation Pavia was preceded more immediately by Siena, which on its attainment of an imperial charter of foundation in 1357 promptly forbad its subjects from attending other universities and recalled those who were currently doing so.16 Similarly the deployment of Savi or Riformatori dello Studio, again stressed as characteristic by those who emphasize the common features of the universities of the territorial states, was standard practice in many universities before the emergence of these three (again the example of Siena shows quite detailed arrangements);17 all that was different now was the need to govern universities in provincial cities by remote control, which gave a peculiar twist to the workings of these committees.

<...>
(quite a gap)
<...>
Quote:
In this periodization the history of the Italian universities closely follows that of humanism itself.66

Note 66 has:
Quote:
Cf. the concluding remarks in Rundle, ‘Humanism across Europe’, cit., 334–335.

 
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #103 - 16.10.2013 at 11:59:45
 
This University of St. Thomas ass. prof. tt. job add has:
Quote:
Professor in early modern (1500-1815) French or British history
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #104 - 16.10.2013 at 16:39:08
 
Quote from hck on 16.10.2013 at 11:59:45:
This University of St. Thomas ass. prof. tt. job add has:
Quote:
Professor in early modern (1500-1815) French or British history

 
This University of Arkansas job add begs to differ:
Quote:
tenure-track, assistant professor of Early Modern European History (including Britain), ca. 1350-1750

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Reply #105 - 24.10.2013 at 12:34:12
 
This Heidelberg job add for a full professorship for Early Modern German literature apparently has something like 1500 and 1799 as the borders of the period:
Quote:

W3-Professur für Neuere Deutsche Literatur mit dem Schwerpunkt Frühe Neuzeit
(Nachfolge Wilhelm Kühlmann)

zu besetzen.

Der Schwerpunkt der Professur liegt auf der Literatur und Kultur des 16. bis 18. Jahrhunderts. Erwünscht wird darüber hinaus ein weiterer Schwerpunkt, vorzugsweise in Klassik und Romantik.
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Reply #106 - 18.11.2013 at 13:52:59
 
This information about a 2013-12-09/13 Warburg Institute workshop and this associated document have 1400 and 1800 as the borders for early modern. The assopiciated document gives some flexibility for the start of that "period"/period:
Quote:
between  c. 1400  and 1800

(highlighting mine)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #107 - 02.12.2013 at 11:05:57
 
This project information concerning an Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy has:
Quote:
Philosophy between 1300 and 1650

(bolding mine).
And it's "Renaissance philosophy", not "early modern philosophy" (or something like that).
 


 
For reasons completely unrelated to this: I don't intend to participate by writing an entry for that project.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #108 - 06.02.2014 at 11:43:18
 
From a CfP received 2014-02-05 via the FICINO email distribution list:
Quote:


For the next Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) to be held October 16-19, 2014 at the Astor Crowne Plaza Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (SSEMW) is offering sponsorship for panels on topics focusing on women and gender in the early modern era (ca. 1450 – ca. 1660).

(bolding mine (hck))
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #109 - 07.05.2014 at 15:22:21
 
This University of Adelaide (School of History and Politics) add for a "Research Fellowship" has:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700

(bolding mine).
 
They also have:
Quote:
Focusing on Early Modern Europe (excluding Britain)

.
I doubt that this is meant to state that Britain was/is no part of Europe and/or was never "Early Modern". But you never know.  Wink
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Reply #110 - 02.07.2014 at 11:15:21
 
This "CFP - Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches" (bolding mine), published 2014-07-01, has:
 
Quote:
they give students a historically accurate understanding of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophies

which seems to indicate that the "early modern" period stretches from 1600 to 1799.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #111 - 30.07.2014 at 15:15:39
 
Quote from hck on 02.07.2014 at 11:15:21:
This "CFP - Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches" (bolding mine), published 2014-07-01, has:

Quote:
they give students a historically accurate understanding of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophies

which seems to indicate that the "early modern" period stretches from 1600 to 1799.

 
The same view seems to be present in Donald Rutherford: The Future of the History of Modern Philosophy (2014-07-21):
 
Quote:
Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. While good things came out of it, it was in some ways a frustrating endeavor. It seemed impossible at the time to construct a coherent narrative and commission a set of chapters that encompassed the richness and historical significance of both seventeenth and eighteenth-century philosophy.

(bolding mine)
 
Nota bene: this continues:
Quote:
To the extent that the volume represented itself as doing this, I was rightly criticized by reviewers for giving short shrift to the eighteenth century. The lesson in this, perhaps, is that “early modern philosophy” can’t have it both ways. If it can’t expand its focus to take in eighteenth-century thought, it should simply rename itself “seventeenth-century philosophy” and give up the pretense of being anything more than this.

Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, which I now coedit with Garber, does a better job of avoiding this problem. Besides papers on canonical seventeenth-century figures, recent volumes have included contributions on Reid, Hutcheson, Hume, Wolff and Baumgarten.

But here, too, we face a dilemma: what to do about Kant?

 
...
 
Quote:
So, here is the first thing that recommends a Society for ModernPhilosophy. Let’s give up the pretense that early modern philosophy takes in the period of philosophy from Montaigne to Kant. Let’s concede that “early modern philosophy” more often than not means seventeenth-century philosophy, with occasional references to Berkeley, Reid and Hume, and let’s adopt “modern philosophy” as a more inclusive banner that leaves no doubt that the eighteenth century is as central to the concerns of the Society’s members as the seventeenth century.

I support this development as promoting transparency and honesty in advertising. No longer should specialists on Hume, Reid or Kant see themselves as second-class citizens in the world of “early modern philosophy.” We should not fool ourselves, though, that we are thereby overcoming all the problems of periodization. A question I haven’t heard answered is how modern the Society’s organizers see “modern philosophy” as being. Does it extend beyond Kant to later German idealists? To nineteenth-century positivists, naturalists and neo-Kantians? To Marx? To Schopenhauer and Nietzsche? To Frege and early analytic philosophy? If there are problems drawing the chronological boundaries of early modern philosophy and ensuring that it is sufficiently inclusive of eighteenth-century figures, the same problems will arise in defining the relation of nineteenth and early twentieth-century philosophy to the activities of the Society for Modern Philosophy.

 


 
Thanks to Stefan Heßbrüggen on G+ for pointing me to this text (via https://plus.google.com/b/111440998814490691210/101454796161503739033/posts/2GB7 R7r9Hqz?cfem=1 )!
 


 
Somehow Rutherford's text seems to focus rather little on the shift connected with university philosophy going from Latin to Vernacular (earlier in some places and contexts, later in other places and contexts). The same goes (with at least one exception) for the methods and approaches of those who research and discuss philosophy texts.  
 
History of the histories of periodisations is also not exactly the main topic either.
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Reply #112 - 31.07.2014 at 11:58:30
 
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Reply #113 - 31.07.2014 at 12:03:20
 
And this job add (University of British Columbia, History : Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History) has:
 
Quote:
The Department of History, University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of assistant professor in the history of early modern Europe, with an expected start date of 1 July 2015. The department is interested in candidates who focus on the history of western or central Europe during the period 1450-1700.

 
 
 
(I guess I'll use highlighting instead of bolding here from now on, as it makes more obvious what parts of "special typography" are mine, and which are found in the source ... .)
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Reply #114 - 19.08.2014 at 13:18:40
 
This job add (Northwestern University (Illinois, USA) , History, Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History) has:
Quote:
tenure-track assistant professor of early modern European history, 1500-1800

 
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Reply #115 - 18.09.2014 at 10:06:41
 
Parts of Brian Garcia's review of Paul Richard Blum's 2010 book Philosophy of Religion in the Renaissance (2014-09-16) are of potential relevance in the context of this thread:
 
  Quote:
The area of Renaissance philosophy seems to gain attention from historians primarily, thereby suffering from neglect by those interested and specialized in philosophy. One reason for this is that the Renaissance seems to lack ‘great thinkers’ who typically define those broad historical categories in philosophy known as Ancient, Medieval, and Modern. The Renaissance has neither an Augustine nor Descartes, an Angelic Doctor nor a Kant—so far as concerns typical syllabi in philosophy curriculum, at any rate. Renaissance thought is typically seen from one of two angles, both employing broad strokes: in the first instance, it is simply a continuation (for some, perhaps a stale continuation) of the medieval traditions with some help from rediscovered Antiquity; alternatively, some aspects of the Renaissance are seen as  precursors to enlightened Modern thinking, even if only in a confused or seminal form. One of the arguments running in the background of Paul Richard Blum’s Philosophy of Religion in the Renaissance is that “modern philosophy originated in the Renaissance as a rupture and a beginning,” all the while never denying that Renaissance philosophy has its origins in the Middle Ages
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Reply #116 - 21.10.2014 at 13:13:56
 
This CfP (for Scientiae 2015) (seen thanks to Agnes Karpinski on G+) has:
 
Quote:
emergent knowledge practices of the early-modern period (1450-1750)
.
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Reply #117 - 17.03.2015 at 10:25:37
 
This Vienna job add ("Universitätsassistent/in ("post doc")am Institut für Geschichte") has 1550-1815 for "early modern":
Quote:
Erwartet wird die Kooperation im Forschungsprojekt „Vom Kulturkonflikt zum Nationalkonflikt: Modalitäten und Spielräume diplomatischer Konfliktlösung in der Frühen Neuzeit (1550-1815)“.

 
 


 
Seen thanks to Mareike König on G+.
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Reply #118 - 25.03.2015 at 09:52:28
 
This Miami University job add ("Visiting Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History") has:
Quote:
in the history of Early Modern Europe (1450-1750)
.
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Reply #119 - 25.03.2015 at 10:05:32
 
This HU Berlin press release re RSA 2015 (2015-03-24) has:
Quote:
Die Epoche der Renaissance (1300-1600) fasziniert die Menschen bis heute.
.
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Reply #120 - 06.05.2015 at 11:37:35
 
This job add (Bates College, Visiting Assistant Professor) has:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe (1400-1750)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #121 - 27.07.2015 at 16:29:17
 
Alun Withey at https://twitter.com/DrAlun/status/625669821401825284 pointed me to Thony Christie: When did the (Scientific) Renaissance take place? ( "The Renaissance Mathematicus" 2010-02-07).
 
Some quotes from there:
Quote:
one of them had the following to say:
<...>
The Renaissance started in the 1430s and may be considered complete by 1560, and was driven by the sponsorship of the nobility, perhaps the last flowering of the feudal system.

 
<...>
 
 
Quote:
In terms of artificial historical periods the Renaissance is a particularly difficult beast to pin down (as is for very similar reasons the Scientific Revolution) because it has less to do with any socio-cultural attributes, such as the introduction of the deep blade plough, as with a philosophical mindset that was held by an elitist minority of the population. The problem is made even more complex by the fact that there was not one set of intellectual values that define the Renaissance but sets of varying and even contradictory ones that existed side by side over the period in question. This is wonderfully illustrated in the protracted mudslinging match between Johannes Kepler and Robert Fludd. Fludd is a Renaissance magus in all his glory revelling in alchemy in its most arcane form and totally rejecting the encroaching wave of mathematical science, one of whose staunchest exponents was Kepler. For the historian the answer in surely simple, Fludd is a representative of the dying Renaissance and Kepler an early personification of modern science. Wrong! Kepler is just as much part of the Renaissance as Fludd (who, by the way, also made sensible contribution to the progress of science) but with a different set of Renaissance philosophical beliefs.

 
<...>
 
Quote:
The Renaissance proper was initially a literary movement and is said to start with Petrarca (1304 – 1374) gaining momentum over the next two centuries expanding into art and reaching a climax some time around 1500 or slightly later. Originally a return to the style of the classical or golden Latin in literature as exemplified by Cicero in its later phase it came to include the great Greek authors and in the 16th century the humanist became identified with the tri lingua scholar fluent in Latin Greek and Hebrew. This movement in the humanities (from which this branch of academia takes its name) continues to flourish into the 17th century and pinning down exactly where it ends is very difficult. Francis Yates sees its demise somewhere in the Thirty Years War with humanism still a dominant intellectual force before the start of this bloody altercation but very much in decline after the smoke had cleared on the battle fields of Middle Europe. On the whole I tend to agree with her but I would note that when I attended an English grammar school in the 1960s the model of pedagogic excellence to which I was exposed was a modified version of the Renaissance humanist ideals with A-Levels in Latin, Greek and Ancient History being the most exalted educational goal.

 
This would give us something like ca. 1337 to ca. 1648. (If I read it correctly.)
 
Quote:
I personally take the appearance of the manuscript of the first Latin translation of Ptolemaeus’ Geographia in Florence in 1409, as a convenient starting point of the Scientific Renaissance, as this led to new developments in the sciences that increased and accelerated throughout the 15th century.

As I have already indicated above I personally reject both the Scientific Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution.
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Reply #122 - 12.08.2015 at 09:00:15
 
The Washington (Folger Shakespeare Library) conference Periodization 2.0 (2015-11-05/07) covers sevral topics relevant to this thread here.  
 
Quote:
Description: This symposium will interrogate the intellectual consequences of the habits and practices of periodization. It seeks to push the discussion of periodization beyond first-wave debates (such as “Renaissance” versus “Early Modern”) to consider various modes of temporal organization. Scholars from a variety of disciplines will discuss how period categories function in their respective academic homes, and to consider how trans-disciplinary intellectual conversations are affected by diverse epistemologies of periodization. Sessions will explore the constructive intellectual framework that periodization provides to scholars, what historical study might look like without traditional period divisions, emergent models of temporal organization, the ways material culture allows scholars to rethink temporal categories, how period categories are deployed in the study of the fine arts, the notion of historical period in the context of literary forms, and, as a case study, to what extent Shakespeare’s plays themselves may shape notions of historical periodization.


Organizer: Kristen Poole is Professor of English at the University of Delaware. She is author of, most recently, Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare’s England: Spaces of Demonism, Divinity, and Drama (2011). Her current work focuses on the place of allegory in seventeenth-century scientific thought.


Thursday, November 5, 2015

6:30-7:30
Plenary lecture

Ethan Shagan (History, University of California, Berkeley)


7:30-8:30 Reception


Friday, November 6, 2015

9:30-11:00
Session 1: “Reason Not the Need”

This panel will consider the intellectual value of working with historical periods. It will consider why such divisions, however construed, provide a necessary and constructive intellectual framework for examining the past.

Speakers: Tim Harris (History, Brown University); Steven Zwicker (English, Washington University in St. Louis)

   Chair: Alice Dailey (English, Villanova University)


11:30-1:00
Session 2: “Untimely”

This panel will explore what historical study looks like without traditional period divisions. What does historical study look like without our familiar historical categories? What are emergent new models of temporal organization? Is it possible to study history without historical division?

Speakers: James Simpson (English, Harvard University)

   Chair: Kristen Poole


2:30-4:00
Session 3: “Thing Time”

This panel will question how the study of material cultural makes us re-think temporal categories. How does the longevity – or the ephemerality – of material objects work with or against traditional period divisions? How does matter shape our understanding of time?

Speakers: Kate Giles (Archaeology, University of York); Natasha Korda (English, Wesleyan University)

   Chair: Jeffrey Todd Knight (English, University of Washington)


Saturday, November 7, 2015

9:30-11:00
Session 4: “Period Aesthetics”

This panel will discuss how period categories are active in the study of the fine arts. While cultural history might have one particular relationship with periodization, do aesthetic/time categories like “Baroque,” “Mannerist,” “Metaphysical” continue to do a different type of intellectual work? How are such categories used in musicology, art history, poetics?

Speakers: Wendy Heller (Musicology, Princeton University); Keith Moxey (Art History, Columbia University); Gordon Teskey (English, Harvard University)

   Chair: Lauren Shohet (English, Villanova University)


11:30-1:00
Session 5: “Forms and Time”

This panel considers what happens to the notion of historical period in the context of literary forms. How does the continuity of form across time complicate other political/regnal/social markers of historical period? Or, conversely, how might the introduction of new literary forms function as their own type of period markers?

Speakers: Heather Dubrow (English, Fordham University); Mihoko Suzuki (English, University of Miami)

   Chair: Alan Stewart (English, Columbia University)


2:30-4:00
Session 6: “Shakestime”

This panel considers how Shakespeare and “Shakespeare” relate to historical period. How has “Shakespeare” come to define a period, or to defy period? To what extent did Shakespeare’s plays themselves shape our notions of historical period?

Speakers: Julian Yates (English, University of Delaware); Julia Reinhard Lupton (English, University of California, Irvine)

   Chair: Douglas Bruster (English, University of Texas, Austin)


4:10-5:15
Final Moderated Discussion

Facilitators: David Wallace (English, University of Pennsylvania), Kristen Poole

 


 
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #123 - 15.09.2015 at 08:59:37
 
This entry by Brill for the online version of their Dictionary of Renaissance Latin from Prose Sources / Lexique de la prose latine de la Renaissance Online : Second, Revised and Significantly Expanded Edition / Deuxième édition revue et considérablement augmentée has:
 
Quote:
An online version of the first dictionary of Renaissance Latin, based on its second revised print edition. It records the vocabulary of over 230 Latin prose authors from different regional backgrounds who wrote between c. 1300 and c. 1600, and gives translations in French and English in approximately 11,000 entries.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #124 - 13.10.2015 at 15:45:03
 
This CfP (for the Oxford 2016-07-05/07 Scientiae : Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World conference) has:
Quote:
Proposals are invited for the fifth annual Scientiae conference on disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800). The major premise of this conference series is that knowledge during this period was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of theories, practices and objects, which had yet to be separated into their modern ‘scientific’ configurations.

 


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