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Periodisations, borders (Read 113439 times)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #25 - 28.04.2009 at 09:48:48
 
According to this job add post-mediaeval times started in 1400 (or 1401).
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #26 - 07.05.2009 at 09:41:54
 
The book reviewed in Thomas Hirzel. Review of Zelin, Madeleine, _The Merchants of Zigong: Industrial Entrepreneurship in Early Modern China_. H-HistGeog, H-Net Reviews. January, 2009 apparently has ca. 1800 to the late 1930s as the borders for "early modern":  
 
Quote:
Madeleine Zelin from Columbia University explores in great detail the Zigong salt industry in southern Sichuan from its rise in the early nineteenth century to its decline in the late 1930s.

 
That's the up to now latest positioning of "early modern" in my collection.  Smiley
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Reply #27 - 11.05.2009 at 12:04:54
 
This job add has "c1500 - c1680"  for "early modern".
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #28 - 13.05.2009 at 11:36:37
 
This CfP has Quote:
the early modern period (roughly 1500-1800)
.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #29 - 14.05.2009 at 09:26:03
 
Quote from hck on 13.05.2009 at 11:36:37:
This CfP has Quote:
the early modern period (roughly 1500-1800)
.

 
The CfP is now also available at http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/05/13/revolution-and-evolution-our-3rd-st udent-conference/ .
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Reply #30 - 20.05.2009 at 10:45:59
 
The book pointed to here uses "early modern" for (roughly) the time between 1450 (or 1417?) and 1790.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #31 - 28.05.2009 at 17:37:29
 
This job add has "Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500", i.e.: the post-mediaeval times starting in 1501.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #32 - 09.07.2009 at 09:28:39
 
This H-Net Leiden job add has 1500 to 1870 for "Early Modern". If I remember correctly: this (1870) is the latest "closing date" for "Early Modern" I've seen up to now.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #33 - 17.07.2009 at 08:58:16
 
According to this review there is a 2008 book which uses "late middle ages" for a period up to the 1580s.  
(This might be the latest date for the end of the middle ages collected in this thread here up to now.)
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Re: Periodisations, borders (acts of a 2005 conf.)
Reply #34 - 29.09.2009 at 11:07:57
 
Helmut Neuhaus (ed.):  
Die Frühe Neuzeit als Epoche
München : Oldenbourg 2009
ISBN: 978-3-486-59087-6

 
Quote:
Schlagwort: Neuzeit, Geschichte 1450-1650, Kongress, Erlangen <2005>

BTW & NB: (Some of) the items in that volume go beyond the 1650 border.
 
The TOC is available at http://bvbr.bib-bvb.de:8991/exlibris/aleph/a18_1/apache_media/134EMAQ1DKPQIVHC8V JXBRGMJFSLD8.pdf .
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #35 - 03.11.2009 at 15:33:30
 
The job add at http://h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=39669 has the following:
Quote:
The Department of History at Hunter College, CUNY invites applications for an open-rank professorship in the history of Early Modern Europe (1400-1800)

1400 is one of the earlier dates for the start of "early modern" amongst those in the collection here.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #36 - 03.11.2009 at 15:36:52
 
One more example of a job add with "early modern" starting 1400: http://h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=39673 :
Quote:
Tenure-track position in European history with specialization in the early modern period, circa 1400 to 1815

(Ball State University)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #37 - 09.11.2009 at 12:50:41
 
This LMU job add ("Professur (W 3) für Geschichte der Frühen Neuzeit (Lehrstuhl)") seems to regard 16th-18th cent. (1500-1799?) as equivalent to "early modern".
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #38 - 11.11.2009 at 10:31:54
 
This job add for an "Early Modern European History post at Ball State University, Indiana, USA" has the following text:
Quote:
specialization in the early modern period, circa 1400 to 1815

(highlighting mine)
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Periodisations, borders: magistra 2009-12-20
Reply #39 - 21.12.2009 at 16:32:55
 
magistra has a blog posting with the title How modern was the early modern? at http://magistraetmater.blog.co.uk/2009/12/20/how-modern-was-the-early-modern-761 2284/ .
 
She writes i.a.:  
Quote:
What I want to ask here is what does relocating the Rise of the West to around 1750 mean for early modernists? How ‘modern’ and ‘relevant’ is their period now?

There are several important caveats to make here. One is that modernity is always a concept relative to our own historical period, and so constantly changing. Jonas of Orleans in the ninth century complained about behaviour in modern times (as compared to an apostolic golden age). And it seems to me quite clear that the West now lives in a postmodern world. The second is that I’m not saying that the early modern period didn’t exist or isn’t worthy of study – I’m saying that its interest and significance now has to be demonstrated rather than assumed. There are some very long-term continuities that can be found between 1500 (or before) and modern life, but they are less obvious than they were.

My third point is that it’s not all the early modern period that is really in danger of de-modernization. If you take the early modern period to be 1500-1750 AD/CE (in round figures), 1650-1750 will still get included in many versions of modernity: the one big change in even the standard English Whig model of why the West won is that there’s now more emphasis on the influence of the Dutch Republic. And 1650-1750 can also get counted as modern for its role in the Scientific Revolution. It is 1500-1650 AD/CE that is now looking less and less ‘modern’ and rather more ‘medieval’ and I want to briefly consider why.

One is that the Reformation looks a lot less like the road to modernity now that Protestantism no longer looks modern. At least in the UK, all religious belief is now considered old-fashioned, if not positively primitive: the view that Roman Catholics are uniquely backward has been greatly tempered by seeing (some) US Protestants look equally pre-Enlightenment. And early modern religious wars look especially barbaric to modern eyes.

A second issue is that the Renaissance means a lot less to people than it once did.

...
Quote:
In many ways the label of ‘modernity’ is arbitrary, as exemplified best in the many years when Oxford University’s Modern History course started in 476 AD. If part or all of early modern history became seen as no longer modern, that wouldn’t stop people being fascinated by the Tudors. There are already lots of ‘Medieval and Renaissance’ centres and courses and journals. Even museums now seem to be getting into the act. But I think some early modernists may find it hard if they are expelled from the circle of ‘modernity’: it may smack to them of a loss of status: who wants to be ‘non-modern’ and possibly irrelevant? Medievalists have many years of experience in showing that the non-modern is still vital – perhaps the early modernists will have to learn the same methods to show their continued importance.

 


 
Found thanks to http://twitter.com/MagBaroque/status/6895601320 .
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #40 - 07.01.2010 at 12:33:52
 
This job add has 1500-1800 for "Early Modern Europe".
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Reply #41 - 07.01.2010 at 13:51:11
 
This job add (which is for an Oxford "Four-Year Official Fellowship and Special Lecturership in Early-Modern Dutch History" has the following:
Quote:
have research interests in the history of the Netherlands, and/or its colonies in the period c.1400-c.1800

(all bolding mine).
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Reply #42 - 09.02.2010 at 15:08:13
 
This job add (Wilfrid Laurier University, 2010-02-03) has:
Quote:
The History Department of Wilfrid Laurier University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in early modern European history. We seek to appoint a specialist in European (excluding French) interactions with Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, or Asia, c. 1400-1800.
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Reply #43 - 01.04.2010 at 09:46:34
 
Here is a review of a book which deals with defining the "early modern" period ("period"?):
Hillard von Thiessen on:
Neuhaus, Helmut (ed.):  
Die Frühe Neuzeit als Epoche  
(= Historische Zeitschrift Beiheft 49)
München : Oldenbourg 2009
ISBN 978-3-486-59087-6

 
Alternative URL: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/id=13390
 
Quote:
Dabei ist die Annahme, dass der Zeitraum von
etwa 1500 bis ca. 1800 in der europäischen Geschichte eine gewisse
Einheit repräsentiert, erst in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts
etabliert worden, wie Helmut Neuhaus in der Einleitung des von ihm
herausgegebenen Bandes betont. Seitdem wurden an den meisten
historischen Seminaren Lehrstühle oder Professuren für die Geschichte
der Frühen Neuzeit eingerichtet.

 
There are days on which I tend to hope that this late early modernity will be a passing fad. And today I ask myself whether history of philosophy (where somewhere near the mid of the 14th and 17th centuries there are major breaks felt/perceived by many - a perception perhaps even more common concerning the mid of the 17th century than concerning the mid of the 14th century) is a just special case. And history of art an other special case.  
(I'm prejudiced when it comes to history of music, where I hold the period of the reign of plucked keyboard instruments to be extremely important ... .)
Periodisations for history of theology obviously are not exactly independent of your choice of the the theology/theologies you focus on.
And periodisations in political history will vary according your choice of the regions you take into account. It might be worthwhile to remind oneself sometimes that the dates for the reign of the Ming dynasty do correspond rather well with the dates for a European "Renaissance" from ca. the mid of the 14th to ca. the mid of the 17th century. And the same holds true fro the Japanese Muromachi and Azuchi-Momoyama periods plus the Keichō, Genna and Kan'ei eras. And it certainly is worthwhile to remind oneself even more than sometimes that it does not hold true for many other regions.  
 
And, yes, I know that just to say that it boils down to the question which periodisation will permit you best to tell the story or stories you want to tell might mean to evade the question instead of answering it. But IMO there are not only wrong answers to some questions, but also wrong questions for some answers. Chimerae, hircocervi and bald kings of France and the like are more fit subjects for logic and perhaps for natural history and history of art than for biology.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #44 - 12.04.2010 at 11:22:42
 
This review (or the reviewed book) seems to imply that the middle ages lasted at least to 1532.
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Reply #45 - 03.05.2010 at 17:07:52
 
This job add for a "University of York - Lectureship in Twentieth Century History" has the following header and start of text:
Quote:
University of York  - Lectureship in Twentieth Century History

Location: United Kingdom
Institution Type: College/University
Position Type: Lecturer
Submitted: Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
Main Category: History Education
Secondary Categories:   Early Modern History

Applications are invited for a permanent lectureship in Twentieth century History from 1 October 2010 to enhance the department’s already strong presence in this area. The Department is seeking to appoint an individual in any field of twentieth century history, but has some preference for candidates with interests in transnational or international history. You will also be able to participate in teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels, including our joint MA with Politics, and to contribute to the research of the new interdisciplinary Centre for Modern Studies which was launched in October 2009.

 
(All highlighting is mine.  
And, no, I have not yet found out how exactly to fit this into the timeline. Nor do I have any guesses as to when this "early modern" period extending into the 20th century might have started.)
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Reply #46 - 15.06.2010 at 14:45:54
 
In 1786 Johannes Gurlitt seems to have assume the existence of a period reaching from 1453 to 1786: see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/W4RF/YaBB.pl?num=1276605858/0#0 .
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #47 - 27.08.2010 at 13:04:15
 
This Groningen  job add has "early modern" for 1500 to 1800.
 
Quote:
The chair focuses on the study of the history of the period from 1500 to c. 1800.

 


 
ETA: full job add at http://www.academictransfer.com/employer/RUG/vacancy/5901/lang/en/ .
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #48 - 03.09.2010 at 09:19:39
 
This job add for an University of Michigan - Ann Arbor endowed Chair, Medieval & Early Modern English History has 1700 as the end of the "early modern" period:
Quote:
scholar of medieval or early modern British history (500-1700 CE
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #49 - 16.09.2010 at 11:26:25
 
John Kilcullen's 2010-09-15 SEP entry Medieval Political Philosophy has the following definition of the middle ages/medieval times:  
Quote:
Medieval philosophy is the philosophy produced in Western Europe between Boethius and Descartes, a period of over one thousand years.

 


 
BTW: here's an extract from the TOC of that entry (the items of greatest potential interest to the readers/members of this forum here):
Quote:
# 14. The Conciliar Movement
# 15. Francisco de Vitoria

* 15.1 The Indians Lately Discovered
* 15.2 Just War

# 16. Francisco Suárez

* 16.1 Natural Law and Divine Commands
* 16.2 Political Power
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