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Periodisations, borders (Read 48163 times)
hck
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #75 - 21.12.2011 at 17:40:00
 
LSE 2011/2012 seminar: The Uses of Space In Early Modern History 1500-1850.
(bolding mine)
 
Might be the latest ending date for "early modern" mentioned in this thread up to now.
 


 
Found thanks to https://twitter.com/#!/guillaumeratel/status/149518170313588737
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #76 - 03.02.2012 at 15:36:55
 
Quote from hck on 21.12.2011 at 17:40:00:
LSE 2011/2012 seminar: The Uses of Space In Early Modern History 1500-1850.
(bolding mine)

Might be the latest ending date for "early modern" mentioned in this thread up to now.




Found thanks to https://twitter.com/#!/guillaumeratel/status/149518170313588737

 
They use the same dates in their job add at https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44109 ("Lectureship in Early Modern International History (1500-1850)").
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #77 - 23.02.2012 at 15:14:02
 
What follows might be a misinterpretation due to excessive splitting of hairs, but anyway: as the institution responsible for this CfP for a conference with the title "Transmission, Translation and Dissemination in the European Middle Ages, 1000-1500" calls itself Forum for Medieval & Renaissance Studies in Ireland one might assume that for them the Renaissance starts 1501 at the earliest.  
 
However: For fairness' sake let it be mentioned, that "renaissance" is one of the categories that CfP was posted in.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #78 - 27.02.2012 at 09:47:54
 
This review has Quote:
the early modern age (1500-1800).
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #79 - 27.02.2012 at 16:18:53
 
This is less ordinary:
from an email received via the FICINO email distribution list:
Quote:
The volume Early Modern Rome, 1341-1667, edited by Portia Prebys and totaling some 770 pages, has recently been published by EDISAI of Ferrara. It contains proceedings of a conference held in May 2010 at the University of California, Rome Study Center and at the Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo; the conference was co-sponsored by The Association of American College and University Programs in Italy (AACUPI) and the University of California, Rome Study Center, in conjunction with ACCENT. The conference program is available online at conference.eapitaly.it .

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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #80 - 01.03.2012 at 11:46:16
 
This job add has:
Quote:
Early Modern European History (1500-1700): Fellowship at Balliol College, Oxford with University Lectureship

(bolding mine) and
Quote:
The post is for a specialist in Continental European history, 1500-1700, with a preference for socio-cultural history or socio-political history. There will be no geographical restriction, but, given the Faculty’s developing research interest in Global history, a research expertise in Ottoman history (including the relationships between the Ottoman empire and western Europe) would be strongly welcomed.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #81 - 15.03.2012 at 09:23:40
 
Johannes Weiss proposes a start of "Early Modern" times at 1300 AD for history of cartography: https://plus.google.com/100579824370654026808/posts/NTM3pynFu32
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #82 - 23.03.2012 at 10:25:12
 
At http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/partnerships/queenmary/cultural-networks (Rewiring the Renaissance: Cultural Networks and Information Technologies) you can read i.a. this (bolding mine):
Quote:
the primary aim of this project is to combine archival and library-based scholarship of the Renaissance period (broadly defined as c.1300-1800) with the exploration of new modes of communication in the present.

- a rather early start and probably one of the latest (or even the latest) ending date(s) for "Renaissance" in this thread (as it is now).
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #83 - 11.07.2012 at 13:14:59
 
Early Modern = 1668-1793 : AFAIK we didn't have that one here up to now.
 
In https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=35795 (Jeffrey R. Watt's review of Anne Jacobson Schutte: By Force and Fear: Taking and Breaking Monastic Vows in Early Modern Europe, Ithaca : Cornell University Press 2011) you can read:
Quote:
Schutte looks at a broad swath of time stretching from 1668 to 1793.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #84 - 20.07.2012 at 14:00:28
 
For "Early Modern" as the time 1550 to 1750 see the confrence announcement pointed to at http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/W4RF/YaBB.pl?num=1316767306/28#28
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #85 - 16.10.2012 at 13:22:50
 
This job add defines "early modern" as "Descartes to Hume":
Quote:
a Lectureship in early modern philosophy (Descartes to Hume).

 
(Descartes first work (Compendium musicae) apparently is from 1618, first published 1650; Le Discours de la méthode is from 1637. David Hume died in 1776.)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #86 - 18.10.2012 at 10:41:44
 
Definitely of relevance for the topic of this thread: Newton Key: Crowdsourcing the Early Modern Blogosphere
 
i.a.:
Quote:
The early modern became ensconced in the Anglophone historiographical scene about 1970. Of course, the phrase “early modern” had long existed, sometimes to refer to the first age of humans, more often to refer to a stage in language development (early modern French, or early Modern English after Old English), more rarely to refer to several centuries, and for the latter, mainly in university curricula and mainly with regards to Europe or even England. (for example, Dawson 1888, p. 398; Edwards 1896, p. vii; The Cornell University Register 1869, p. 62). But a few works in the 1960s applied the term to a broad era after the Middle Ages and it graced numerous collections and texts from 1970. Where before one might name royal houses (the Tudor‑Stuart era) or use dates of major wars and treaties (Europe before 1648), from the 1960s one increasingly turned to “early modern” to signify variously 1300‑1700 or 1500‑1800. Two nGrams show the phrase’s dramatic rise as a term in British and American texts since the 1960s (http://tinyurl.com/8to62hf; http://tinyurl.com/9ks9cbc). (Randolph Starn 2002, discovers slightly different progenitors than I do; but we both agree to the sea change in usage circa 1970).
5 0

Outside the Anglophone world, the early modern has been much less eagerly embraced. As Starn shows, German-language academics remain suspicious of frühe Neuzeit, while the French- (and Spanish-) language ones remain committed to histoire moderne as a broad designation, and the ancien régime society of the earlier part of that broad periodization. Again, using Google books Ngram Viewer (http://tinyurl.com/9dhkk9d; http://tinyurl.com/9nm9z8c) suggests that frühe Neuzeit has become increasingly used in the 1990s and 2000s (although still explained as if a novelty, and, confusingly, neuere Geschichte can also refer to the era from the 16th century onwards), while début des temps modernes has seen a steady increase in use since the 1880s (although the latter mainly refers to the point at the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the early modern). Overall, historians tend to group their specialties by century (Revue Dix-Huitième Siècle), and the Anglophone world sometimes stretches that to incorporate the long sixteenth century, or the long eighteenth century (a phraseology which owes more to the Braudelian longue durée).
6 0

The underlying reasons for this change are many, but I would point especially to the triumph of Marxian, Weberian, and especially Tönniesian social theories. Karl Marx’s stadial analysis readily explains the focus on early modern Europe and England, if not the terminology. (Rollison 2005)

 


 
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #87 - 22.11.2012 at 10:23:55
 
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Re: Periodisations, borders (J. Cohen 2012 text)
Reply #88 - 03.12.2012 at 08:54:46
 
Jeffrey J. Cohen: early modern (2012-11-30)
 
 
i.a.:
Quote:
I’ll say a few words about each approach, alterist and continuist, both of which are as familiar in medieval as they are they are in early modern studies, before offering a third possibility.

...
Quote:
Medieval works typically survive in multiple manuscript versions that postdate their putative origin by decades, even centuries. Some like the fourteenth-century travel narrative known as the Book of Mandeville arrive as a polyglot plethora.[3] We are fairly certain the Book was first composed in Anglo-Norman French, but a variety of English Mandevilles also erupted, leading to a tangle of versions from which no urtext can be reconstructed. We do not know who composed the “original” book (other than its author was unlikely to have been John Mandeville) or where the work first found words (France has been guessed, but there is no way to know for certain). Manuscript history suggests the third quarter of the fourteenth century as its date of composition, but the cultural conditions under which it was produced cannot be excavated – and would not, at any rate, enable us to know why Walter Raleigh was citing Mandeville when describing his adventures in Guyana. The text is not anchored in a moment of origin, and continued to reproduce, mutate, and proliferate itself for several centuries. Its narrative is a collage of borrowings, rendering its imagined peregrinations from the start a temporally thick archive.

...
Quote:
The past is not past, is not an absolute difference; nor is the past conjoined to the present in continuity, in sameness. Past, present, and future are a temporal knot, thick with possibility even while impossible to fully untangle

 


 
As of now: 11 comments. The first of which (by Steve Mentz) mentions "Renaissance" (absent from the OP).
 


 
An yes, both OP and comments use far more theory than I'd like to swallow. (Yes, I guess I'll have to accept to be called an old-style postivist, a fetishist of Occam's razor, a dinosaur; but I don't mind.)
 


 
Seen thanks to pointers on G+ ; first seen of these (by me) was by Stefan Heßbrüggen.
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Re: Periodisations, borders (J. Cohen 2012 text)
Reply #89 - 03.12.2012 at 09:51:05
 
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #90 - 11.12.2012 at 16:57:46
 
This job add has "early modern" referring to times prior to 1900:
Quote:
The Department of History at NYU seeks to appoint a scholar of early modern Chinese history (before 1900) t
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #91 - 29.04.2013 at 08:34:19
 
This job add (University of Hertfordshire : Lectureship in Early Modern History) has:
Quote:
We welcome applicants specialising in any area of history since 1500, in particular
those who are able to complement or extend our teaching provision in local
and regional history, early modern history up to 1700, gender history or digital history.

(bolding mine)
 
As far as I can remember: we didn't have "EM=1500-1700" here up to now.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #92 - 22.05.2013 at 13:30:43
 
From http://renaissancejapan.org/about-jars.html :
Quote:
Respecting the scope of the Renaissance Society of America, JARS conceives the Renaissance in a larger time span from ca. 1300 to ca. 1650, through which it also seeks fruitful interactions with Medieval and Early Modern studies.

 
(bolding mine)
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #93 - 05.07.2013 at 11:03:55
 
The Northumbria University job adds at http://work4.northumbria.ac.uk/hrvacs/ads1240 and http://work4.northumbria.ac.uk/hrvacs/ads1221 have
Quote:
in Early Modern British or European History (1500 - 1750)

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
Seen thanks to https://twitter.com/TheHistoryWoman/status/353073242472316928
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Reply #94 - 12.07.2013 at 13:33:01
 
University of Chicago has this job add, in which we have
Quote:
Early Modern European History (c.1400-1700). Geographic preference is open, but it would be desirable to find an historian of the Renaissance with interests in Italy or the Mediterranean world.

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
Job adds mentioning both "early modern" and "Renaissance" are rarae aves indeed ... .
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #95 - 16.07.2013 at 13:14:50
 
20th century? Or Ming and (early) Qing eras? :
Princeton job add (asss. prof. tt):
Quote:
The Departments of History and East Asian Studies at Princeton University invite applications from scholars who specialize in the history of late imperial/early modern China.  
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #96 - 29.07.2013 at 15:31:09
 
This Evanston (Northwestern University)) jobb add for a postion of ass. prof. tt. has (i.a.):
Quote:
Early Modern continental Europe, ca. 1500-1800

 
(unbolding mine)
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Reply #97 - 30.07.2013 at 11:11:07
 
This Ann Arbor (University of Michigan) jobb add for a (full or associate) professorship has (i.a.):
Quote:
the J. Frederick Hoffman Chair, an endowed chair currently designated for Early Modern History, c. 1400-1750

 
(bolding mine)
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Reply #98 - 01.08.2013 at 11:50:23
 
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #99 - 20.08.2013 at 13:01:02
 
York University (Toronto, Canada, not UK!) job add: ass.prof. Early Modern European History:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective July 1, 2014. Candidates’ research and teaching should focus on continental Europe in the period from 1450 to 1750

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
(Recently I get the impression that consensus on the borders of "early modern" is not exactly increasing.)
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