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Periodisations, borders (Read 113230 times)
hck
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Periodisations, borders
03.06.2008 at 09:50:46
 
This is not meant to attack any preferences. This is not intended as a stance on "renaissance" vs. "early modern". This is just meant for documentation, and perhaps for documentation as a basis for discussion.  
 
The reason (or perhaps better the occasion) is that we might see a shift of the borders of the period wherein most of the texts we are writing about where written, the period wherein most of the phenomena we write about did have their basis, etc.. Or we might not.
 
  • For Michelet it's renaissance, and it's 1483 through the 16th century, roughly.
  • For Buckhardt it's "renaissance, and it's roughly ca. 1220 to ca. 1525/1550.
  • The the former library of our institution used to assign "renaissance" shelfmarks to books by/on authors from Dante (incl.) to Descartes (excl.), but with Occam treated as "mediaeval" and Vico treated as "rinascimental"; and Cusanus was once shelved as "mediaeval" and then reshelved to "rinascimental".  (Yes, it's "Seminar für Geistesgeschichte und Philosophie der Renaissance".) On might consider this asx either an approach trying to incoporate somehow several approaches, definitions and concepts, or as utter chaos ... .
  • In 1998 I myself went for ca. 1348 (the Great Plague) to ca. 1648 (Thirty Years War) and Renaissance.
  • The English Wikipedia seems to prefer to treat "renaissance" and "early modern" as rather equivalent, and says it happened in the 14th through 17th centuries.
  • The German version of Wikipedia goes for "renaissance" and the 14th through 16th centuries. In this (and almost only this) respect more or less the same are the choices of the Italian variant.
  • Sharon Howard at http://earlymodernweb.org.uk/emr/ useses "early modern" and ca. 1500-1800. As far as I can see: that's a periodisation used in many many cases where "early modern" is preferred.
  • This CFP for a GEMCS 2008 panel on "drinking and gender in early modern culture" uses 1450 to 1850 as the borders ("Papers from any discipline and focusing on any time periodbetween 1450 and 1850 are welcome.") (It was this CFP which incited me to write this posting here.)

 
Perhaps one should build a database with these and many many other examples, and then try to plot some sort of graphic condensation. Or perhaps such a thing has already been done? Any pointers by anyone?
 
Anyway: I'll use this thread here whenever I find any new periodisation statements or examples which seem to be interesting to me.
Feel free and invited to do so as well.
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Reply #1 - 04.06.2008 at 09:19:58
 
The CFP which can be found here has "early modern" and  1400 to 1800. (I.e.: a rather early start of the period for a text that uses "early modern" and not "renaissance".)
 
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Reply #2 - 09.07.2008 at 10:55:24
 
In this CFP (To Have and To Hold:  Marriage in Pre-Modern Europe 1200-1700)  however we obviously have "modernity" start in 1700, so that the whole "renaissance" in the borders preferred by me (ca. 1348 to ca. 1648) would not be "early modern" but just "pre-modern".
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Reply #3 - 11.07.2008 at 11:25:19
 
At http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/07/05/arts/conway.php (continued at http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/07/05/arts/conway.php?page=2 ) you can find an International Herald Tribune 2008-07-04 article by Roderick Conway Morris: "Under Frederick II, the first rebirth of Roman culture" which (without quoting Burckhardt) has the Renaissance start with (and at least somewhat started by) emperor Fridericus II.
 


Found thanks to http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=H-HRE&month=0807&a mp;week=b&msg=F/En7DUl8EjBcDEg1UQG3A&user=&pw=
 


ETA: The website of the exhibition "Exempla. La rinascita dell'antico nell'arte italiana. Da Federico II ad Andrea Pisano" can be found at http://www.mostraexempla.it/
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Reply #4 - 03.09.2008 at 12:29:42
 
Cliopatria's Appendices has under the heading "Pre-Modern History"  i.a. links to blogs with the following titles:  
- 18th Century Blog
- 18th c. Cuisine
- 18th Century Historical Trekking
-  Early Modern News
-  Early Modern Notes
-  Early Modern Rambler
-  Early Modern Whale
-  The Long Eighteenth
 
Near the end there is the following:
Quote:
Caveat Lector: Categories are an abstraction. Many blogs do not categorize well. We've done the best we can. Neither category, order or position are intended as value or quality judgements.

 


 
Found thanks to http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/?p=175 .
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Reply #5 - 05.09.2008 at 14:37:53
 
This one here is from German Gerrman philology: at the Berlin 2008-10-11 conference with the title Neue Perspektiven der Mittelalterrezeption there will be the following talks:
  • Quote:
    Johannes Klaus Kipf (München):
    Wann beginnt im deutschen Sprachraum die Mittelalterrezeption?
    Vergleichende Beobachtungen zu lateinischen und volkssprachigen Rezeptionsweisen
    mittelalterlicher Literatur (ca. 1450–1600)

     
     
    (which might imply that post mediaeval times started in 1450)
  • Quote:
    Norbert Kössinger (München):
    Deutsche Texte des Frühmittelalters in der frühen Neuzeit. Zu einigen Voraussetzungen
    für eine Geschichte der philologischen Mittelalterrezeption vom 16.
    - 18. Jahrhundert

    (ca. 1500 as the starting date of post-mediaeval times?)

 
The conference program can be found at http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/Download/mittelalterrezeptionstagu ng.pdf . (Found via http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/lehrende/chronik/2008/we4_tagung_m ittelalterrezeption.html .)
 
See also the press release at http://idw-online.de/pages/de/news276771 (which first pointed me to this conference.)
 
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Reply #6 - 16.09.2008 at 12:16:21
 
The job ad at http://www.h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=37236 (Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Early Modern Studies, "Art History, English, or History") seeks somebody specialised in "the period from c. 1600 to c. 1800".
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Reply #7 - 01.10.2008 at 17:11:07
 
The CFP for the San José 2009 conference Shifting Paradigms in Early Modern Studies i.a. asks the question Quote:
Does “Early Modern” have a significantly different meaning
from “Renaissance”?
.
 
If anyone amongst you, the readers of this forum, should be able to find out whether (and if yes: how) this question will be or was answered at said conference: please let me/us know about it. Thanks in advance!
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Reply #8 - 28.10.2008 at 10:40:57
 
This CFP has the following phrase: "pre- and early modern periods (up to ca.1820)",
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Reply #9 - 05.12.2008 at 09:42:32
 
John Culp's SEP enty on Panentheism (2008-12-04(/05)) uses a rather "extended" concept of the middle ages:
Quote:
In the Middle Ages, the influence of Neoplatonism continued in the thought of Eriugena (815–877), Eckhart (1260–1328), Nicholas of Cusa (1401–1464), and Boehme (1575–1624).

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Reply #10 - 14.01.2009 at 10:03:23
 
The item pointed to here might be an example of the "middle ages" ending in 1550.
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Reply #11 - 28.01.2009 at 09:22:28
 
H-Soz-u-Kult flagged this review of a 1517/18 text with "MA" (for middle ages).
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Reply #12 - 28.01.2009 at 13:25:51
 
The organisers of the Oxford conference on Social Cohesion in Pre-Modern England, 1500-1800 seem to consider 1700 as the end of the "early modern" period, as they write:
Quote:
Models for conceptualizing the social order in the historiographies of early modern and eighteenth-century England

(bolding mine)
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Reply #13 - 11.02.2009 at 14:01:05
 
This CFP for a Canterbury conference on Reading and Writing in Renaissance Society 1400-1700 obviously assumes that both the years 1400 and 1700 belong to the "Renaissance".
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Reply #14 - 17.02.2009 at 09:15:03
 
The title of the book reviewed here uses "Early Modern" for the time between 1400 and 1800.
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Reply #15 - 18.02.2009 at 10:27:49
 
This CFP for a Dublin June 2009 confernce with the title Continuities: From “Medieval” to “Early Modern” in English Literature (1400-1650) addresses the question of periodisation:
Quote:
‘Early modernists’ have begun to question the term ‘renaissance’ (with its associations of value and teleology) in order to envision the period of artistic achievement as one which began long before the emergence of Shakespeare.

...
Quote:
interrogating the terms ‘medieval’/‘renaissance’/‘early modern’; the renaissance ‘canon’.

 
 
The conference website is at http://continuitiesconference.blogspot.com/ .
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Reply #16 - 04.03.2009 at 10:06:23
 
The item reviewed at http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/id=11779&count=7504& recno=1&type=rezbuecher&sort=datum&order=down has "Frühneuzeit" (early modern) for the period 1500-1800.
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Reply #17 - 16.03.2009 at 16:58:54
 
This CFP (which is focussed on Rome) uses "early modern" for the time between 1341 and 1667.
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Reply #18 - 16.03.2009 at 17:01:59
 
Quote from hck on 16.03.2009 at 16:58:54:
This CFP (which is focussed on Rome) uses "early modern" for the time between 1341 and 1667.

 
I found this especially remarkable, as I myself do use ore or less the same temporal borders when going hunting for items of potential professional interest to me (ca. 1348 to ca. 1648: Great Plague to Peace of Westphalia), although I use "Renaissance" as a tag for that period.
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Reply #19 - 17.03.2009 at 11:58:21
 
The 2009-02-18 review by Ferdinand Mount at http://www.spectator.co.uk/books/3367371/how-different-from-us.thtml has the following:
Quote:
The odd thing is that, as Thomas points out, nobody seems quite sure when ‘Early Modern’ begins or ends. Suggested starting dates range between 1300 and 1560, and the end date may be fixed anywhere between 1660 and 1800 — or even later. On the web, I spotted a conference advertised in Oklahoma on ‘Early Modern Culture 1492-1848’. At the other end, Professor Colin Morris places ‘the discovery of the individual’ somewhere near the beginning of the 12th century. So that makes about 700 years in which our ancestors were trying to get up to speed.

 
 


 
Found thanks to http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/03/04/the-ends-of-life-new-book-by-keith- thomas/ .
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Reply #20 - 18.03.2009 at 13:29:38
 
This text, which I received via H-HRE has 1100 to 1800 for "early  modernities":
Quote:
Conference Announcement


Comparative Early Modernities: 1100-1800

Hussey Room
Michigan League
University of Michigan
April 17-18, 2009


Featuring conversations among twelve leading scholars of early modern
Asia, Europe, and South America, this interdisciplinary conference will
showcase novel comparative perspectives in the fields of literary, social,
art, and economic history and re-examine the theoretical and
methodological premises of comparative historical studies.


Program:

April 17th - Day 1

9:15 - 11:30 am Session I: Globalizing Early Modernity
Walter Cohen (Cornell University), "Out of India: Global Early Modernity"
Ayesha Ramachandran (SUNY Stony Brook), "A War of Worlds: Becoming 'Early
Modern' and the Challenge of Comparison"

1:00 - 3:15 pm Session II: Writing Across Worlds
Luke Clossey (Simon Fraser University), "Did Aurangzeb Write Tom Jones?
Eurocentrism and Writing the Early Modern World"
Su Fang Ng (University of Oklahoma), "Dutch Wars, Global Trade, and the
Heroic Poem: Dryden's 'Annus Mirabilis' (1666) and Amin's 'Syair Perang
Mengkasar' (1670)"

3:30 - 5:45 pm Session III: Comparative Cultural History
Claudia Brosseder (University of Heidelberg), "Magic in Comparative
Perspective: Early Modern Europe and Colonial Latin America"
Richard Vinograd (Stanford University), "Accommodating Incompatibilities
in Early Visual Modernity"


April 18th - Day 2

9:15 - 11:30 am Session I: Region and Tradition
Jack Goldstone (George Mason University), "Cultural Trajectories: The
Power of the Traditional within the Early Modern"
Kenneth Pomeranz (UC Irvine), "Areas, Networks, and the Search for 'Early
Modern' East Asia"

1:00 - 3:15 pm Session V: Family and Sexuality
Katherine Carlitz (University of Pittsburgh), "Pornography, Chastity, and
'Early Modernity' in China, England, and France"
Ann Waltner (University of Minnesota), "Comparing Family Histories in the
Early Modern Period: The View from China"

3:30 - 5:45 pm Session VI: Comparative Historiography
Gregory Blue (University of Victoria), "The Rise and Fall of Enlightenment
Sinophilia: Did Political Economy Lead the Way?"
R. Bin Wong (UC Los Angeles), "Did China's Late Empire have an Early
Modern Era?"


REGISTRATION:

Seating at this event will be limited and pre-registration is strongly
recommended.

UM Faculty and Students - Send an email to
gelsevents@umich.edu<mailto:gelsevents@umich.edu> to register.

Visitors - Register online at: http://conferences.housing.umich.edu/cemc


LOGISTICS:

For further details about this event, including information on hotels and
transportation, please visit Our conference website is
http://www.umich.edu/~cemc<http://www.umich.edu/%7Ecemc> , email
gelsevents@umich.edu<mailto:gelsevents@umich.edu>, or call 734-647-4893.
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Reply #21 - 25.03.2009 at 09:44:28
 
The CFP at http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/32501 has 1500 as either the end or part of the middle ages.
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Reply #22 - 22.04.2009 at 10:05:01
 
A Munich lecture series might discuss some of the aspects of the periodisations concerning and borders of "our" period.
 
See the press release and the introduiction plus programme.
 
The programme uses only "early modern" and according to the press release it is about the 15th through 17th century.
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Reply #23 - 22.04.2009 at 10:14:54
 
http://www1.spiegel.de/active/quiztool/fcgi/quiztool.fcgi?id=39380&a=4 offers for the end of the middle ages:
Quote:
Der Wissenstest in Geschichte

Frage 2 von 36

Wann ungefähr endete das Mittelalter?

* 15. Jahrhundert
* 18. Jahrhundert
* Mit den Kreuzzügen
* Mit der Völkerwanderung

 
By taking the test I found out that they want "15th cent." as the "correct" answer, and in their corrolarium they write i.a.:
Quote:
Der Begriff des Mittelalters hat sich in der Folgezeit dann als Epochenbegriff mit tendenziell abwertender Bedeutung etabliert, wobei die Epochengrenzen meist einerseits mit dem Ende des Weströmischen Reiches im Jahr 476 und andererseits mit der Eroberung Konstantinopels im Jahr 1453 durch die Osmanen angesetzt wurde, letzteres speziell im Hinblick darauf, dass byzantinische Gelehrte bei ihrer Flucht in den Westen wichtige griechische Handschriften mitbrachten, die dem lateinischen Mittelalter unbekannt geblieben oder nur durch arabische Übersetzungen bekannt geworden waren.

and
Quote:
Die Bezeichnung „Mittelalter“ bezieht sich in erster Linie auf die Geschichte des christlichen Abendlands vor der Reformation, denn der Begriff wird kaum im Zusammenhang mit außereuropäischen Kulturen verwendet. Im Groben ordnet man das Mittelalter in die Zeit von 500 bzw. 600 n. Chr. bis etwa 1500 ein. Wesentlich konkreter sind jedoch folgende Bezugsdaten:

Das Mittelalter erstreckt sich ungefähr vom Ende der Völkerwanderung (375–568) bzw. vom Untergang des weströmischen Kaisertums 476 bis zum Zeitalter der Renaissance seit der Mitte des 15. Jahrhunderts bzw. bis zum Beginn des 16. Jahrhunderts (bezüglich der Problematik der Datierung des Beginns des Mittelalters siehe Ende der Antike und Spätantike).

Die Datierungen sind nicht immer einheitlich, es kommt oft darauf an, welche Aspekte der Entwicklung bevorzugt werden und von welchem Land man ausgeht. Stellt man zum Beispiel den Einfluss des Islam in den Vordergrund, kann man Mohammeds Hidschra (622) oder den Beginn der arabischen Expansion ab 632 als Beginn sehen. Ebenso gibt es unterschiedliche Datierungsmöglichkeiten für das Ende des Mittelalters, beispielsweise die Erfindung des Buchdrucks (um 1450), die Eroberung von Konstantinopel 1453, die Entdeckung Amerikas 1492 oder auch der Beginn der Reformation (1517). Fokussiert man einzelne Länder, so kann man auch zu verschiedenen Eckdaten kommen. So endete die Antike am Rhein oder in Britannien aufgrund der dortigen Entwicklungen während der Völkerwanderung sicher früher als etwa in Syrien. Auf der anderen Seite war zum Beispiel zu Beginn des 15. Jahrhunderts in Italien bereits das Zeitalter der Renaissance angebrochen, während man zur gleichen Zeit in England noch vom Mittelalter spricht.
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Reply #24 - 27.04.2009 at 09:22:12
 
Stephen H. Daniel's The Early Modern Philosophy Calendar has "late 16th, 17th, and 18th century" as "early modern".
 


 
Found thanks to http://twitter.com/charlesnodier .
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Reply #25 - 28.04.2009 at 09:48:48
 
According to this job add post-mediaeval times started in 1400 (or 1401).
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Reply #26 - 07.05.2009 at 09:41:54
 
The book reviewed in Thomas Hirzel. Review of Zelin, Madeleine, _The Merchants of Zigong: Industrial Entrepreneurship in Early Modern China_. H-HistGeog, H-Net Reviews. January, 2009 apparently has ca. 1800 to the late 1930s as the borders for "early modern":  
 
Quote:
Madeleine Zelin from Columbia University explores in great detail the Zigong salt industry in southern Sichuan from its rise in the early nineteenth century to its decline in the late 1930s.

 
That's the up to now latest positioning of "early modern" in my collection.  Smiley
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Reply #27 - 11.05.2009 at 12:04:54
 
This job add has "c1500 - c1680"  for "early modern".
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Reply #28 - 13.05.2009 at 11:36:37
 
This CfP has Quote:
the early modern period (roughly 1500-1800)
.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #29 - 14.05.2009 at 09:26:03
 
Quote from hck on 13.05.2009 at 11:36:37:
This CfP has Quote:
the early modern period (roughly 1500-1800)
.

 
The CfP is now also available at http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/05/13/revolution-and-evolution-our-3rd-st udent-conference/ .
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Reply #30 - 20.05.2009 at 10:45:59
 
The book pointed to here uses "early modern" for (roughly) the time between 1450 (or 1417?) and 1790.
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Reply #31 - 28.05.2009 at 17:37:29
 
This job add has "Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500", i.e.: the post-mediaeval times starting in 1501.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #32 - 09.07.2009 at 09:28:39
 
This H-Net Leiden job add has 1500 to 1870 for "Early Modern". If I remember correctly: this (1870) is the latest "closing date" for "Early Modern" I've seen up to now.
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Reply #33 - 17.07.2009 at 08:58:16
 
According to this review there is a 2008 book which uses "late middle ages" for a period up to the 1580s.  
(This might be the latest date for the end of the middle ages collected in this thread here up to now.)
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Re: Periodisations, borders (acts of a 2005 conf.)
Reply #34 - 29.09.2009 at 11:07:57
 
Helmut Neuhaus (ed.):  
Die Frühe Neuzeit als Epoche
München : Oldenbourg 2009
ISBN: 978-3-486-59087-6

 
Quote:
Schlagwort: Neuzeit, Geschichte 1450-1650, Kongress, Erlangen <2005>

BTW & NB: (Some of) the items in that volume go beyond the 1650 border.
 
The TOC is available at http://bvbr.bib-bvb.de:8991/exlibris/aleph/a18_1/apache_media/134EMAQ1DKPQIVHC8V JXBRGMJFSLD8.pdf .
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Reply #35 - 03.11.2009 at 15:33:30
 
The job add at http://h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=39669 has the following:
Quote:
The Department of History at Hunter College, CUNY invites applications for an open-rank professorship in the history of Early Modern Europe (1400-1800)

1400 is one of the earlier dates for the start of "early modern" amongst those in the collection here.
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Reply #36 - 03.11.2009 at 15:36:52
 
One more example of a job add with "early modern" starting 1400: http://h-net.org/jobs/display_job.php?jobID=39673 :
Quote:
Tenure-track position in European history with specialization in the early modern period, circa 1400 to 1815

(Ball State University)
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Reply #37 - 09.11.2009 at 12:50:41
 
This LMU job add ("Professur (W 3) für Geschichte der Frühen Neuzeit (Lehrstuhl)") seems to regard 16th-18th cent. (1500-1799?) as equivalent to "early modern".
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Reply #38 - 11.11.2009 at 10:31:54
 
This job add for an "Early Modern European History post at Ball State University, Indiana, USA" has the following text:
Quote:
specialization in the early modern period, circa 1400 to 1815

(highlighting mine)
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Periodisations, borders: magistra 2009-12-20
Reply #39 - 21.12.2009 at 16:32:55
 
magistra has a blog posting with the title How modern was the early modern? at http://magistraetmater.blog.co.uk/2009/12/20/how-modern-was-the-early-modern-761 2284/ .
 
She writes i.a.:  
Quote:
What I want to ask here is what does relocating the Rise of the West to around 1750 mean for early modernists? How ‘modern’ and ‘relevant’ is their period now?

There are several important caveats to make here. One is that modernity is always a concept relative to our own historical period, and so constantly changing. Jonas of Orleans in the ninth century complained about behaviour in modern times (as compared to an apostolic golden age). And it seems to me quite clear that the West now lives in a postmodern world. The second is that I’m not saying that the early modern period didn’t exist or isn’t worthy of study – I’m saying that its interest and significance now has to be demonstrated rather than assumed. There are some very long-term continuities that can be found between 1500 (or before) and modern life, but they are less obvious than they were.

My third point is that it’s not all the early modern period that is really in danger of de-modernization. If you take the early modern period to be 1500-1750 AD/CE (in round figures), 1650-1750 will still get included in many versions of modernity: the one big change in even the standard English Whig model of why the West won is that there’s now more emphasis on the influence of the Dutch Republic. And 1650-1750 can also get counted as modern for its role in the Scientific Revolution. It is 1500-1650 AD/CE that is now looking less and less ‘modern’ and rather more ‘medieval’ and I want to briefly consider why.

One is that the Reformation looks a lot less like the road to modernity now that Protestantism no longer looks modern. At least in the UK, all religious belief is now considered old-fashioned, if not positively primitive: the view that Roman Catholics are uniquely backward has been greatly tempered by seeing (some) US Protestants look equally pre-Enlightenment. And early modern religious wars look especially barbaric to modern eyes.

A second issue is that the Renaissance means a lot less to people than it once did.

...
Quote:
In many ways the label of ‘modernity’ is arbitrary, as exemplified best in the many years when Oxford University’s Modern History course started in 476 AD. If part or all of early modern history became seen as no longer modern, that wouldn’t stop people being fascinated by the Tudors. There are already lots of ‘Medieval and Renaissance’ centres and courses and journals. Even museums now seem to be getting into the act. But I think some early modernists may find it hard if they are expelled from the circle of ‘modernity’: it may smack to them of a loss of status: who wants to be ‘non-modern’ and possibly irrelevant? Medievalists have many years of experience in showing that the non-modern is still vital – perhaps the early modernists will have to learn the same methods to show their continued importance.

 


 
Found thanks to http://twitter.com/MagBaroque/status/6895601320 .
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Reply #40 - 07.01.2010 at 12:33:52
 
This job add has 1500-1800 for "Early Modern Europe".
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Reply #41 - 07.01.2010 at 13:51:11
 
This job add (which is for an Oxford "Four-Year Official Fellowship and Special Lecturership in Early-Modern Dutch History" has the following:
Quote:
have research interests in the history of the Netherlands, and/or its colonies in the period c.1400-c.1800

(all bolding mine).
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Reply #42 - 09.02.2010 at 15:08:13
 
This job add (Wilfrid Laurier University, 2010-02-03) has:
Quote:
The History Department of Wilfrid Laurier University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in early modern European history. We seek to appoint a specialist in European (excluding French) interactions with Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, or Asia, c. 1400-1800.
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Reply #43 - 01.04.2010 at 09:46:34
 
Here is a review of a book which deals with defining the "early modern" period ("period"?):
Hillard von Thiessen on:
Neuhaus, Helmut (ed.):  
Die Frühe Neuzeit als Epoche  
(= Historische Zeitschrift Beiheft 49)
München : Oldenbourg 2009
ISBN 978-3-486-59087-6

 
Alternative URL: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/id=13390
 
Quote:
Dabei ist die Annahme, dass der Zeitraum von
etwa 1500 bis ca. 1800 in der europäischen Geschichte eine gewisse
Einheit repräsentiert, erst in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts
etabliert worden, wie Helmut Neuhaus in der Einleitung des von ihm
herausgegebenen Bandes betont. Seitdem wurden an den meisten
historischen Seminaren Lehrstühle oder Professuren für die Geschichte
der Frühen Neuzeit eingerichtet.

 
There are days on which I tend to hope that this late early modernity will be a passing fad. And today I ask myself whether history of philosophy (where somewhere near the mid of the 14th and 17th centuries there are major breaks felt/perceived by many - a perception perhaps even more common concerning the mid of the 17th century than concerning the mid of the 14th century) is a just special case. And history of art an other special case.  
(I'm prejudiced when it comes to history of music, where I hold the period of the reign of plucked keyboard instruments to be extremely important ... .)
Periodisations for history of theology obviously are not exactly independent of your choice of the the theology/theologies you focus on.
And periodisations in political history will vary according your choice of the regions you take into account. It might be worthwhile to remind oneself sometimes that the dates for the reign of the Ming dynasty do correspond rather well with the dates for a European "Renaissance" from ca. the mid of the 14th to ca. the mid of the 17th century. And the same holds true fro the Japanese Muromachi and Azuchi-Momoyama periods plus the Keichō, Genna and Kan'ei eras. And it certainly is worthwhile to remind oneself even more than sometimes that it does not hold true for many other regions.  
 
And, yes, I know that just to say that it boils down to the question which periodisation will permit you best to tell the story or stories you want to tell might mean to evade the question instead of answering it. But IMO there are not only wrong answers to some questions, but also wrong questions for some answers. Chimerae, hircocervi and bald kings of France and the like are more fit subjects for logic and perhaps for natural history and history of art than for biology.
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Reply #44 - 12.04.2010 at 11:22:42
 
This review (or the reviewed book) seems to imply that the middle ages lasted at least to 1532.
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Reply #45 - 03.05.2010 at 17:07:52
 
This job add for a "University of York - Lectureship in Twentieth Century History" has the following header and start of text:
Quote:
University of York  - Lectureship in Twentieth Century History

Location: United Kingdom
Institution Type: College/University
Position Type: Lecturer
Submitted: Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
Main Category: History Education
Secondary Categories:   Early Modern History

Applications are invited for a permanent lectureship in Twentieth century History from 1 October 2010 to enhance the department’s already strong presence in this area. The Department is seeking to appoint an individual in any field of twentieth century history, but has some preference for candidates with interests in transnational or international history. You will also be able to participate in teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels, including our joint MA with Politics, and to contribute to the research of the new interdisciplinary Centre for Modern Studies which was launched in October 2009.

 
(All highlighting is mine.  
And, no, I have not yet found out how exactly to fit this into the timeline. Nor do I have any guesses as to when this "early modern" period extending into the 20th century might have started.)
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Reply #46 - 15.06.2010 at 14:45:54
 
In 1786 Johannes Gurlitt seems to have assume the existence of a period reaching from 1453 to 1786: see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/W4RF/YaBB.pl?num=1276605858/0#0 .
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Reply #47 - 27.08.2010 at 13:04:15
 
This Groningen  job add has "early modern" for 1500 to 1800.
 
Quote:
The chair focuses on the study of the history of the period from 1500 to c. 1800.

 


 
ETA: full job add at http://www.academictransfer.com/employer/RUG/vacancy/5901/lang/en/ .
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Reply #48 - 03.09.2010 at 09:19:39
 
This job add for an University of Michigan - Ann Arbor endowed Chair, Medieval & Early Modern English History has 1700 as the end of the "early modern" period:
Quote:
scholar of medieval or early modern British history (500-1700 CE
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Reply #49 - 16.09.2010 at 11:26:25
 
John Kilcullen's 2010-09-15 SEP entry Medieval Political Philosophy has the following definition of the middle ages/medieval times:  
Quote:
Medieval philosophy is the philosophy produced in Western Europe between Boethius and Descartes, a period of over one thousand years.

 


 
BTW: here's an extract from the TOC of that entry (the items of greatest potential interest to the readers/members of this forum here):
Quote:
# 14. The Conciliar Movement
# 15. Francisco de Vitoria

* 15.1 The Indians Lately Discovered
* 15.2 Just War

# 16. Francisco Suárez

* 16.1 Natural Law and Divine Commands
* 16.2 Political Power
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Reply #50 - 22.09.2010 at 12:18:59
 
In the CFP at http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=H-Ideas&month=1009 &week=c&msg=nW1QAfdqenOTFCufApJNmw&user=&pw= you can read i.a.:
Quote:
We define our period broadly as premodernity c. 500-1500 CE, always with
flexible time horizons, and always with the understanding that the
semi-convenient term "Middle Ages" is a heuristic category under erasure,
and with diminished purchase for cultures and worlds outside premodern
Europe.

(bolding mine).
 
If I translate this text correctly it implies that "early modern" times start in 1501.
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Reply #51 - 20.10.2010 at 11:58:15
 
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Reply #52 - 20.10.2010 at 12:19:03
 
Perhaps of interest: this information on a Cork 2010 conference "Doing Renaissance Now":
Quote:
We wish to focus on the concept of Renaissance as it applies to a particular time and place still regarded as crucially important for world-wide ways of life and thought. However, even this outlook is open to our questioning. What indeed, does it mean to be doing Renaissance Studies Now—not only in terms of the field itself, but in terms of what our field has to say to contemporary society? In the past, the field of Renaissance Studies has drawn themes and orientations from particular concerns of the moment, without losing the rigorous focus, and has given back crucial insights. What Now? To facilitate a many-sided discussion, the conference is articulated in ten parts relating to chief areas of this transdisciplinary and multifaceted field within the humanities and social sciences: History, Languages and Literatures, History of Science, Cultural Studies, Classical Studies, Gender Studies, Art History, Philosophy, Sociology, Politics.

The debate on Renaissance versus Early Modern as periodical concepts has only served to sharpen perceptions of what is at stake in the notion of a Renaissance—not that there is yet substantial agreement on this or on any other aspect of the period’s ontology. Perhaps in a time of “Renewal” and “Reform” of social, political and economic systems, with all the attendant dangers and benefits, the notion of “Renaissance” and all this has entailed, holds a certain appeal. The conference will attend to the deepest resonances and draw some conclusions.
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Reply #53 - 27.10.2010 at 10:39:56
 
According to the series publishing the book reviewed here the 18th century is not even early modern but premodern:
Quote:
Schlecking, Katja: Adelige Unternehmer im geistlichen Staat. Die Hütten-
und Hammerwerke der Freiherren von Dücker zu Menden-Rödinghausen im 18.
Jahrhundert
(= Westfalen in der Vormoderne 6). Münster: Aschendorff
Verlag 2010. ISBN 978-3-402-15045-0

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Reply #54 - 27.10.2010 at 11:41:08
 
The title of the conference the following is a CfP for is also pertinent to this thread here:  Early Modern Migrations: Exiles, Expulsion, & Religious Refugees 1400-1700 (Toronto 2012)
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Reply #55 - 29.10.2010 at 16:44:46
 
The CfP quoted here seems to define "early modern" as 1500 to 1699.
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Reply #56 - 08.02.2011 at 10:41:35
 
This Oxford job add defines "Early Modern" as 1500-1700.
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Reply #57 - 05.04.2011 at 10:54:25
 
This job add shows, that the "German Enlightenment" (whatever that might be) is considered as belonging to Early Modern times by the Division of Jewish Philosophy, Bar-Ilan University.
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Reply #58 - 28.04.2011 at 08:49:41
 
The 2011-03-11 "Welcome Post" of the Early Modern Food Network at http://earlymodernfoodnetwork.blogspot.com/2011/03/welcome-post.html has 1500 to 1800 for "Early modern":
Quote:
Welcome to the Early Modern Food Network, a blog dedicated to the study of food, diet, and theories of consumption from roughly 1500 to 1800
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Reply #59 - 28.04.2011 at 09:46:08
 
At http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/W4RF/YaBB.pl?num=1303976533/0#0 you can find information about an event which uses "Renaissance" for items from 1564 to 1694.
 
I didn't check all entries here, but this might be the "latest" borders used for "renaissance" up to now in the collection constituted by this thread here.
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Reply #60 - 04.07.2011 at 09:54:21
 
From a mail sent to the FICINO email distribution list (and read by me today):
 
Quote:
Proposals are sought for a potential new book series at AMS Press (New
York), edited by Phillip John Usher (Barnard College, Columbia
University). The aim of this new series is to make important texts of
the French Renaissance available in modern English translations. The
period is here approximately defined as 1450-1600, but individual
exceptions will be encouraged.

(Bolding mine)
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Reply #61 - 03.08.2011 at 14:11:09
 
This Leiden job add has:
Quote:
the field of Early Modern European History (16th to early 19th century)

 
Even not knowing when exactly the early 19th century might have ended: this might be the "latest" upper boundary of "early modern" we have in this thread here.
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Reply #62 - 23.08.2011 at 09:22:19
 
On this (and other topics) see The Beginnings and Ends of Cultural Studies:  
i.a.:
Quote:
the Group for Early Modern Cultural Students (GEMCS), originally conceived to bring together scholars from a range of pre-1900 fields, has been attracting mostly students and professors in the field formerly known as “Renaissance;”

...
Quote:
Partly, I think, this is due the fact that while twenty years ago the phrase “early modern” offered a range of possibilities, it has now, at least professionally, simply replaced “Renaissance,” so younger scholars coming into the discipline cannot be blamed for (mistakenly) assuming that a paper on Jane Austen would have no place at a GEMCS meeting.

 


 
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Reply #63 - 04.10.2011 at 15:17:11
 
This Boston job add has 1500 to 1750 for early modern. (It's from the history department.)
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Reply #64 - 11.10.2011 at 15:42:55
 
This USA job add ("Mediterranean World") has:
Quote:
early modern era (15th-18th centuries)

(bolding by hck)
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Reply #65 - 24.10.2011 at 08:25:15
 
The London 2011-1--19 (Courtauld Institute) Third Early Modern Symposium "Art Against the Wall" has 1550-1850 as its limits for "early modern" in its announcement.
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Reply #66 - 24.10.2011 at 13:44:14
 
This announcement re the Society for Renaissance Studies Book Prize (2011-10-24) has Quote:
the chronological period 1300–1650
(bolding mine) for "Renaissance".
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Reply #67 - 07.11.2011 at 17:15:29
 
Nothing extraordinary: in the US job add at https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=43680 you can read Quote:
Early Modern European History (1500-1800)
.
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Reply #68 - 10.11.2011 at 14:38:29
 
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Reply #69 - 14.11.2011 at 12:32:21
 
This CfP for the "Inaugural Conference of the North-East Medieval and early Modern Symposium" has:
Quote:
period c. 1400- c. 1700

 
No idea what label they'd use for the pre1400 period(s). SCNR.
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Reply #70 - 29.11.2011 at 10:31:21
 
Early modern as 1540-1689: received via the FICINO email distribution list:  
Quote:
Call for H-ALBION Book Review Editor: History of England, Wales, and
Scotland 1540-1689

H-Albion is looking for candidates who would like serve as our Book
Review Editor for England, Wales, and Scotland, 1540-1689.  Applications
are invited from scholars specializing in the early modern period.  The
successful candidate will serve as book review editor for two years and
will be responsible for commissioning and editing book reviews.
Please send a cover letter and CV to Jason M. Kelly at jaskelly@iupui.edu.

Application deadline is 1 December 2011

 
(Highlighting mine.)
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Reply #71 - 01.12.2011 at 08:24:22
 
Assuming that the "Renaissance" and/or "Early Modern" times start after the middle ages: this item might be of interest in the context of this thread here:
 
Eleni Sakellariou:
Southern Italy in the Late Middle Ages : Demographic, Institutional and Economic Change in the Kingdom of Naples, c.1440-c.1530
Leiden : Brill 2011 <?>
ISBN: 9789004224063

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Reply #72 - 01.12.2011 at 15:51:57
 
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« Last Edit: 02.12.2011 at 09:14:43 by hck »  

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Reply #73 - 13.12.2011 at 17:17:06
 
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Reply #74 - 20.12.2011 at 12:37:07
 
From the job add at http://earlymodernhistory1.blogspot.com/2011/12/fellowship-in-early-modern-histo ry-at.html :  
Quote:
The post is for an early modern historian with special interests in the visual and/or material culture, c. 1550-1750.

(bolding mine)
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Reply #75 - 21.12.2011 at 17:40:00
 
LSE 2011/2012 seminar: The Uses of Space In Early Modern History 1500-1850.
(bolding mine)
 
Might be the latest ending date for "early modern" mentioned in this thread up to now.
 


 
Found thanks to https://twitter.com/#!/guillaumeratel/status/149518170313588737
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Reply #76 - 03.02.2012 at 15:36:55
 
Quote from hck on 21.12.2011 at 17:40:00:
LSE 2011/2012 seminar: The Uses of Space In Early Modern History 1500-1850.
(bolding mine)

Might be the latest ending date for "early modern" mentioned in this thread up to now.




Found thanks to https://twitter.com/#!/guillaumeratel/status/149518170313588737

 
They use the same dates in their job add at https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44109 ("Lectureship in Early Modern International History (1500-1850)").
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Reply #77 - 23.02.2012 at 15:14:02
 
What follows might be a misinterpretation due to excessive splitting of hairs, but anyway: as the institution responsible for this CfP for a conference with the title "Transmission, Translation and Dissemination in the European Middle Ages, 1000-1500" calls itself Forum for Medieval & Renaissance Studies in Ireland one might assume that for them the Renaissance starts 1501 at the earliest.  
 
However: For fairness' sake let it be mentioned, that "renaissance" is one of the categories that CfP was posted in.
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Reply #78 - 27.02.2012 at 09:47:54
 
This review has Quote:
the early modern age (1500-1800).
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Reply #79 - 27.02.2012 at 16:18:53
 
This is less ordinary:
from an email received via the FICINO email distribution list:
Quote:
The volume Early Modern Rome, 1341-1667, edited by Portia Prebys and totaling some 770 pages, has recently been published by EDISAI of Ferrara. It contains proceedings of a conference held in May 2010 at the University of California, Rome Study Center and at the Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo; the conference was co-sponsored by The Association of American College and University Programs in Italy (AACUPI) and the University of California, Rome Study Center, in conjunction with ACCENT. The conference program is available online at conference.eapitaly.it .

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Reply #80 - 01.03.2012 at 11:46:16
 
This job add has:
Quote:
Early Modern European History (1500-1700): Fellowship at Balliol College, Oxford with University Lectureship

(bolding mine) and
Quote:
The post is for a specialist in Continental European history, 1500-1700, with a preference for socio-cultural history or socio-political history. There will be no geographical restriction, but, given the Faculty’s developing research interest in Global history, a research expertise in Ottoman history (including the relationships between the Ottoman empire and western Europe) would be strongly welcomed.
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Reply #81 - 15.03.2012 at 09:23:40
 
Johannes Weiss proposes a start of "Early Modern" times at 1300 AD for history of cartography: https://plus.google.com/100579824370654026808/posts/NTM3pynFu32
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Reply #82 - 23.03.2012 at 10:25:12
 
At http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/partnerships/queenmary/cultural-networks (Rewiring the Renaissance: Cultural Networks and Information Technologies) you can read i.a. this (bolding mine):
Quote:
the primary aim of this project is to combine archival and library-based scholarship of the Renaissance period (broadly defined as c.1300-1800) with the exploration of new modes of communication in the present.

- a rather early start and probably one of the latest (or even the latest) ending date(s) for "Renaissance" in this thread (as it is now).
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Reply #83 - 11.07.2012 at 13:14:59
 
Early Modern = 1668-1793 : AFAIK we didn't have that one here up to now.
 
In https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=35795 (Jeffrey R. Watt's review of Anne Jacobson Schutte: By Force and Fear: Taking and Breaking Monastic Vows in Early Modern Europe, Ithaca : Cornell University Press 2011) you can read:
Quote:
Schutte looks at a broad swath of time stretching from 1668 to 1793.
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Reply #84 - 20.07.2012 at 14:00:28
 
For "Early Modern" as the time 1550 to 1750 see the confrence announcement pointed to at http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/W4RF/YaBB.pl?num=1316767306/28#28
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Reply #85 - 16.10.2012 at 13:22:50
 
This job add defines "early modern" as "Descartes to Hume":
Quote:
a Lectureship in early modern philosophy (Descartes to Hume).

 
(Descartes first work (Compendium musicae) apparently is from 1618, first published 1650; Le Discours de la méthode is from 1637. David Hume died in 1776.)
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Reply #86 - 18.10.2012 at 10:41:44
 
Definitely of relevance for the topic of this thread: Newton Key: Crowdsourcing the Early Modern Blogosphere
 
i.a.:
Quote:
The early modern became ensconced in the Anglophone historiographical scene about 1970. Of course, the phrase “early modern” had long existed, sometimes to refer to the first age of humans, more often to refer to a stage in language development (early modern French, or early Modern English after Old English), more rarely to refer to several centuries, and for the latter, mainly in university curricula and mainly with regards to Europe or even England. (for example, Dawson 1888, p. 398; Edwards 1896, p. vii; The Cornell University Register 1869, p. 62). But a few works in the 1960s applied the term to a broad era after the Middle Ages and it graced numerous collections and texts from 1970. Where before one might name royal houses (the Tudor‑Stuart era) or use dates of major wars and treaties (Europe before 1648), from the 1960s one increasingly turned to “early modern” to signify variously 1300‑1700 or 1500‑1800. Two nGrams show the phrase’s dramatic rise as a term in British and American texts since the 1960s (http://tinyurl.com/8to62hf; http://tinyurl.com/9ks9cbc). (Randolph Starn 2002, discovers slightly different progenitors than I do; but we both agree to the sea change in usage circa 1970).
5 0

Outside the Anglophone world, the early modern has been much less eagerly embraced. As Starn shows, German-language academics remain suspicious of frühe Neuzeit, while the French- (and Spanish-) language ones remain committed to histoire moderne as a broad designation, and the ancien régime society of the earlier part of that broad periodization. Again, using Google books Ngram Viewer (http://tinyurl.com/9dhkk9d; http://tinyurl.com/9nm9z8c) suggests that frühe Neuzeit has become increasingly used in the 1990s and 2000s (although still explained as if a novelty, and, confusingly, neuere Geschichte can also refer to the era from the 16th century onwards), while début des temps modernes has seen a steady increase in use since the 1880s (although the latter mainly refers to the point at the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the early modern). Overall, historians tend to group their specialties by century (Revue Dix-Huitième Siècle), and the Anglophone world sometimes stretches that to incorporate the long sixteenth century, or the long eighteenth century (a phraseology which owes more to the Braudelian longue durée).
6 0

The underlying reasons for this change are many, but I would point especially to the triumph of Marxian, Weberian, and especially Tönniesian social theories. Karl Marx’s stadial analysis readily explains the focus on early modern Europe and England, if not the terminology. (Rollison 2005)

 


 
Seen thanks to Zsolt Almási on Google+.
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Reply #87 - 22.11.2012 at 10:23:55
 
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Re: Periodisations, borders (J. Cohen 2012 text)
Reply #88 - 03.12.2012 at 08:54:46
 
Jeffrey J. Cohen: early modern (2012-11-30)
 
 
i.a.:
Quote:
I’ll say a few words about each approach, alterist and continuist, both of which are as familiar in medieval as they are they are in early modern studies, before offering a third possibility.

...
Quote:
Medieval works typically survive in multiple manuscript versions that postdate their putative origin by decades, even centuries. Some like the fourteenth-century travel narrative known as the Book of Mandeville arrive as a polyglot plethora.[3] We are fairly certain the Book was first composed in Anglo-Norman French, but a variety of English Mandevilles also erupted, leading to a tangle of versions from which no urtext can be reconstructed. We do not know who composed the “original” book (other than its author was unlikely to have been John Mandeville) or where the work first found words (France has been guessed, but there is no way to know for certain). Manuscript history suggests the third quarter of the fourteenth century as its date of composition, but the cultural conditions under which it was produced cannot be excavated – and would not, at any rate, enable us to know why Walter Raleigh was citing Mandeville when describing his adventures in Guyana. The text is not anchored in a moment of origin, and continued to reproduce, mutate, and proliferate itself for several centuries. Its narrative is a collage of borrowings, rendering its imagined peregrinations from the start a temporally thick archive.

...
Quote:
The past is not past, is not an absolute difference; nor is the past conjoined to the present in continuity, in sameness. Past, present, and future are a temporal knot, thick with possibility even while impossible to fully untangle

 


 
As of now: 11 comments. The first of which (by Steve Mentz) mentions "Renaissance" (absent from the OP).
 


 
An yes, both OP and comments use far more theory than I'd like to swallow. (Yes, I guess I'll have to accept to be called an old-style postivist, a fetishist of Occam's razor, a dinosaur; but I don't mind.)
 


 
Seen thanks to pointers on G+ ; first seen of these (by me) was by Stefan Heßbrüggen.
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Re: Periodisations, borders (J. Cohen 2012 text)
Reply #89 - 03.12.2012 at 09:51:05
 
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Reply #90 - 11.12.2012 at 16:57:46
 
This job add has "early modern" referring to times prior to 1900:
Quote:
The Department of History at NYU seeks to appoint a scholar of early modern Chinese history (before 1900) t
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Reply #91 - 29.04.2013 at 08:34:19
 
This job add (University of Hertfordshire : Lectureship in Early Modern History) has:
Quote:
We welcome applicants specialising in any area of history since 1500, in particular
those who are able to complement or extend our teaching provision in local
and regional history, early modern history up to 1700, gender history or digital history.

(bolding mine)
 
As far as I can remember: we didn't have "EM=1500-1700" here up to now.
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Reply #92 - 22.05.2013 at 13:30:43
 
From http://renaissancejapan.org/about-jars.html :
Quote:
Respecting the scope of the Renaissance Society of America, JARS conceives the Renaissance in a larger time span from ca. 1300 to ca. 1650, through which it also seeks fruitful interactions with Medieval and Early Modern studies.

 
(bolding mine)
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Reply #93 - 05.07.2013 at 11:03:55
 
The Northumbria University job adds at http://work4.northumbria.ac.uk/hrvacs/ads1240 and http://work4.northumbria.ac.uk/hrvacs/ads1221 have
Quote:
in Early Modern British or European History (1500 - 1750)

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
Seen thanks to https://twitter.com/TheHistoryWoman/status/353073242472316928
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Reply #94 - 12.07.2013 at 13:33:01
 
University of Chicago has this job add, in which we have
Quote:
Early Modern European History (c.1400-1700). Geographic preference is open, but it would be desirable to find an historian of the Renaissance with interests in Italy or the Mediterranean world.

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
Job adds mentioning both "early modern" and "Renaissance" are rarae aves indeed ... .
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Reply #95 - 16.07.2013 at 13:14:50
 
20th century? Or Ming and (early) Qing eras? :
Princeton job add (asss. prof. tt):
Quote:
The Departments of History and East Asian Studies at Princeton University invite applications from scholars who specialize in the history of late imperial/early modern China.  
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Reply #96 - 29.07.2013 at 15:31:09
 
This Evanston (Northwestern University)) jobb add for a postion of ass. prof. tt. has (i.a.):
Quote:
Early Modern continental Europe, ca. 1500-1800

 
(unbolding mine)
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Reply #97 - 30.07.2013 at 11:11:07
 
This Ann Arbor (University of Michigan) jobb add for a (full or associate) professorship has (i.a.):
Quote:
the J. Frederick Hoffman Chair, an endowed chair currently designated for Early Modern History, c. 1400-1750

 
(bolding mine)
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Reply #98 - 01.08.2013 at 11:50:23
 
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Reply #99 - 20.08.2013 at 13:01:02
 
York University (Toronto, Canada, not UK!) job add: ass.prof. Early Modern European History:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective July 1, 2014. Candidates’ research and teaching should focus on continental Europe in the period from 1450 to 1750

 
(bolding mine)
 


 
(Recently I get the impression that consensus on the borders of "early modern" is not exactly increasing.)
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Reply #100 - 22.08.2013 at 02:08:44
 
Note:
Flasch, Kurt. Das philosophische Denken im Mittelalter: von Augustin zu Machiavelli. Stuttgart: P. Reclam, 1986.
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Reply #101 - 17.09.2013 at 10:33:49
 
Quote from prblum on 22.08.2013 at 02:08:44:
Note:
Flasch, Kurt. Das philosophische Denken im Mittelalter: von Augustin zu Machiavelli. Stuttgart: P. Reclam, 1986.

 
Yep. And then there's of course Frederick Copleston's classic Augustine to Scotus for "the Middle Ages" and Ockham to Suarez (p. vii of the 1985 reprint of the 1962/1963 edition C. calls Occam "the last great English philosopher of the Middle Ages", p. 18 he talks about "Renaissance philosophy").  
 


 
re: Copleton's "English philosopher":
(Periodisations and chronological borders are already a can of worms. If somebody should want to discuss geographical, political, and/or "religious"/"confessional" borders <some of you know that I myself talk about religious orders and "communities in rites/in ritibus" when talking about the period(s) we are concerned with, and consider talking about religions and/or "confessional" entities as not exactly useful for anything but pretending to explain phenomena although one is not able to grasp them; no, you don't have to agree; no, I don't expect most of you to agree>, anyway:  If you should want to discuss geographical, political, and/or "religious"/"confessional" borders in this forum here: all of you members of this forum are certainly welcome to do so, but, as IMO these are not the same can of worms the question of chronological borders is: I'd suggest that you create one or several new threads for that.)
 


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Reply #102 - 14.10.2013 at 16:34:47
 
This item here somheow fits into this thread here, and somehow it doesn't fit:
 
Denley, Peter:
‘Medieval’, ‘Renaissance’, ‘modern’. Issues of periodization in  Italian university history
in: "Renaissance Studies" 27.4 (2013), pp. 487-503
(2013-09-11)

 
Quote:
Abstract:
Italian university historiography is strongly influenced by current notions of periodization and change. ‘Medieval’ universities have been seen as unique but soon outdated creations, to be overtaken by ‘Renaissance’ universities in which the driving forces were the requirements of ‘princes’ or whoever else was at the helm of the ‘territorial state’. The ‘Renaissance’ universities, and even more their ‘modern’ successors, are supposed to have been more functional, more responsive to demand and to the aspirations of rulers and elites – and thus, by implication, more ‘efficient’. But this reading fails to take full cognisance of the true significance of the medieval universities, which in practice were strongly pragmatic foundations as well as idealistic ones. From the thirteenth century, Italian universities in particular were locked in a mechanism of market forces that ensured that they were constantly open to fresh initiatives and constantly subject to change. This contribution reassesses these institutions and contests the traditional chronological perspectives.

 
From the article itself:
Quote:
Italian writers on university history have largely followed the trend of the last generation or so which has re-periodized the Renaissance, pushing the ‘early modern’ period back by a century or so, and focusing on the growth of ‘the Renaissance state’ as a key development.9 The standard view has a landmark date, 1361, the year in which Galeazzo II Visconti founded the University of Pavia: a ‘despot’ creating a university that would be subject to his whim and will, and doing so not in his own capital but in a subject town, while of course ensuring that all but the most trivial decisions regarding it were taken not in Pavia but in Milan. The idea that this constituted the beginning of a new approach is enhanced by events of 1405–06, when Venice, conquering Padua, took over what was effectively the peninsula's second studio and formalized its role as the official university of the republic, also choosing to rule it from the capital. A third decision, that of Lorenzo de' Medici to transfer the hitherto modest studio of Florence to Pisa in 1472–73, ‘parachuting’ it into a declining subject city (to use Piero Del Negro's fortunate expression),10 and re-launching it there while yet again retaining control from the centre, completed the trend. With this move, all three of the major territorial states of northern/central Italy had, by different routes, arrived at the same model of universities at arm's length from the metropolis, in subject towns with their own strong local significance and civic identities.11 Alongside this pattern, one could add the point that the other two main new studi of the period were instituted and governed by princes; the University of Ferrara, which opened briefly in 1391 but had to be refounded in 1442, again very much under the control of the Este,12 and that of Turin, founded in 1404 as the university for Savoy and run largely by its count.13

<...>
Quote:
Though Pavia is credited with the introduction of the famous protectionist measures whereby subjects of the state were not allowed to attend a university outside the territory, and students and teachers were forbidden to leave for another centre, it was in fact not the first studio to have this stipulation. Frederick II had made the same provision when he founded the University of Naples in 1224, and although its peculiar situation and the discontinuities of its history might incline one to dismiss this as exceptional, it is harder to ignore another example, closer in time and place; in terms of protectionist legislation Pavia was preceded more immediately by Siena, which on its attainment of an imperial charter of foundation in 1357 promptly forbad its subjects from attending other universities and recalled those who were currently doing so.16 Similarly the deployment of Savi or Riformatori dello Studio, again stressed as characteristic by those who emphasize the common features of the universities of the territorial states, was standard practice in many universities before the emergence of these three (again the example of Siena shows quite detailed arrangements);17 all that was different now was the need to govern universities in provincial cities by remote control, which gave a peculiar twist to the workings of these committees.

<...>
(quite a gap)
<...>
Quote:
In this periodization the history of the Italian universities closely follows that of humanism itself.66

Note 66 has:
Quote:
Cf. the concluding remarks in Rundle, ‘Humanism across Europe’, cit., 334–335.

 
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Reply #103 - 16.10.2013 at 11:59:45
 
This University of St. Thomas ass. prof. tt. job add has:
Quote:
Professor in early modern (1500-1815) French or British history
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Reply #104 - 16.10.2013 at 16:39:08
 
Quote from hck on 16.10.2013 at 11:59:45:
This University of St. Thomas ass. prof. tt. job add has:
Quote:
Professor in early modern (1500-1815) French or British history

 
This University of Arkansas job add begs to differ:
Quote:
tenure-track, assistant professor of Early Modern European History (including Britain), ca. 1350-1750

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Reply #105 - 24.10.2013 at 12:34:12
 
This Heidelberg job add for a full professorship for Early Modern German literature apparently has something like 1500 and 1799 as the borders of the period:
Quote:

W3-Professur für Neuere Deutsche Literatur mit dem Schwerpunkt Frühe Neuzeit
(Nachfolge Wilhelm Kühlmann)

zu besetzen.

Der Schwerpunkt der Professur liegt auf der Literatur und Kultur des 16. bis 18. Jahrhunderts. Erwünscht wird darüber hinaus ein weiterer Schwerpunkt, vorzugsweise in Klassik und Romantik.
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Reply #106 - 18.11.2013 at 13:52:59
 
This information about a 2013-12-09/13 Warburg Institute workshop and this associated document have 1400 and 1800 as the borders for early modern. The assopiciated document gives some flexibility for the start of that "period"/period:
Quote:
between  c. 1400  and 1800

(highlighting mine)
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Reply #107 - 02.12.2013 at 11:05:57
 
This project information concerning an Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy has:
Quote:
Philosophy between 1300 and 1650

(bolding mine).
And it's "Renaissance philosophy", not "early modern philosophy" (or something like that).
 


 
For reasons completely unrelated to this: I don't intend to participate by writing an entry for that project.
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Reply #108 - 06.02.2014 at 11:43:18
 
From a CfP received 2014-02-05 via the FICINO email distribution list:
Quote:


For the next Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) to be held October 16-19, 2014 at the Astor Crowne Plaza Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (SSEMW) is offering sponsorship for panels on topics focusing on women and gender in the early modern era (ca. 1450 – ca. 1660).

(bolding mine (hck))
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Reply #109 - 07.05.2014 at 15:22:21
 
This University of Adelaide (School of History and Politics) add for a "Research Fellowship" has:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700

(bolding mine).
 
They also have:
Quote:
Focusing on Early Modern Europe (excluding Britain)

.
I doubt that this is meant to state that Britain was/is no part of Europe and/or was never "Early Modern". But you never know.  Wink
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Reply #110 - 02.07.2014 at 11:15:21
 
This "CFP - Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches" (bolding mine), published 2014-07-01, has:
 
Quote:
they give students a historically accurate understanding of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophies

which seems to indicate that the "early modern" period stretches from 1600 to 1799.
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Reply #111 - 30.07.2014 at 15:15:39
 
Quote from hck on 02.07.2014 at 11:15:21:
This "CFP - Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches" (bolding mine), published 2014-07-01, has:

Quote:
they give students a historically accurate understanding of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophies

which seems to indicate that the "early modern" period stretches from 1600 to 1799.

 
The same view seems to be present in Donald Rutherford: The Future of the History of Modern Philosophy (2014-07-21):
 
Quote:
Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. While good things came out of it, it was in some ways a frustrating endeavor. It seemed impossible at the time to construct a coherent narrative and commission a set of chapters that encompassed the richness and historical significance of both seventeenth and eighteenth-century philosophy.

(bolding mine)
 
Nota bene: this continues:
Quote:
To the extent that the volume represented itself as doing this, I was rightly criticized by reviewers for giving short shrift to the eighteenth century. The lesson in this, perhaps, is that “early modern philosophy” can’t have it both ways. If it can’t expand its focus to take in eighteenth-century thought, it should simply rename itself “seventeenth-century philosophy” and give up the pretense of being anything more than this.

Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, which I now coedit with Garber, does a better job of avoiding this problem. Besides papers on canonical seventeenth-century figures, recent volumes have included contributions on Reid, Hutcheson, Hume, Wolff and Baumgarten.

But here, too, we face a dilemma: what to do about Kant?

 
...
 
Quote:
So, here is the first thing that recommends a Society for ModernPhilosophy. Let’s give up the pretense that early modern philosophy takes in the period of philosophy from Montaigne to Kant. Let’s concede that “early modern philosophy” more often than not means seventeenth-century philosophy, with occasional references to Berkeley, Reid and Hume, and let’s adopt “modern philosophy” as a more inclusive banner that leaves no doubt that the eighteenth century is as central to the concerns of the Society’s members as the seventeenth century.

I support this development as promoting transparency and honesty in advertising. No longer should specialists on Hume, Reid or Kant see themselves as second-class citizens in the world of “early modern philosophy.” We should not fool ourselves, though, that we are thereby overcoming all the problems of periodization. A question I haven’t heard answered is how modern the Society’s organizers see “modern philosophy” as being. Does it extend beyond Kant to later German idealists? To nineteenth-century positivists, naturalists and neo-Kantians? To Marx? To Schopenhauer and Nietzsche? To Frege and early analytic philosophy? If there are problems drawing the chronological boundaries of early modern philosophy and ensuring that it is sufficiently inclusive of eighteenth-century figures, the same problems will arise in defining the relation of nineteenth and early twentieth-century philosophy to the activities of the Society for Modern Philosophy.

 


 
Thanks to Stefan Heßbrüggen on G+ for pointing me to this text (via https://plus.google.com/b/111440998814490691210/101454796161503739033/posts/2GB7 R7r9Hqz?cfem=1 )!
 


 
Somehow Rutherford's text seems to focus rather little on the shift connected with university philosophy going from Latin to Vernacular (earlier in some places and contexts, later in other places and contexts). The same goes (with at least one exception) for the methods and approaches of those who research and discuss philosophy texts.  
 
History of the histories of periodisations is also not exactly the main topic either.
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Reply #112 - 31.07.2014 at 11:58:30
 
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Reply #113 - 31.07.2014 at 12:03:20
 
And this job add (University of British Columbia, History : Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History) has:
 
Quote:
The Department of History, University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of assistant professor in the history of early modern Europe, with an expected start date of 1 July 2015. The department is interested in candidates who focus on the history of western or central Europe during the period 1450-1700.

 
 
 
(I guess I'll use highlighting instead of bolding here from now on, as it makes more obvious what parts of "special typography" are mine, and which are found in the source ... .)
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Reply #114 - 19.08.2014 at 13:18:40
 
This job add (Northwestern University (Illinois, USA) , History, Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History) has:
Quote:
tenure-track assistant professor of early modern European history, 1500-1800

 
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Reply #115 - 18.09.2014 at 10:06:41
 
Parts of Brian Garcia's review of Paul Richard Blum's 2010 book Philosophy of Religion in the Renaissance (2014-09-16) are of potential relevance in the context of this thread:
 
  Quote:
The area of Renaissance philosophy seems to gain attention from historians primarily, thereby suffering from neglect by those interested and specialized in philosophy. One reason for this is that the Renaissance seems to lack ‘great thinkers’ who typically define those broad historical categories in philosophy known as Ancient, Medieval, and Modern. The Renaissance has neither an Augustine nor Descartes, an Angelic Doctor nor a Kant—so far as concerns typical syllabi in philosophy curriculum, at any rate. Renaissance thought is typically seen from one of two angles, both employing broad strokes: in the first instance, it is simply a continuation (for some, perhaps a stale continuation) of the medieval traditions with some help from rediscovered Antiquity; alternatively, some aspects of the Renaissance are seen as  precursors to enlightened Modern thinking, even if only in a confused or seminal form. One of the arguments running in the background of Paul Richard Blum’s Philosophy of Religion in the Renaissance is that “modern philosophy originated in the Renaissance as a rupture and a beginning,” all the while never denying that Renaissance philosophy has its origins in the Middle Ages
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Reply #116 - 21.10.2014 at 13:13:56
 
This CfP (for Scientiae 2015) (seen thanks to Agnes Karpinski on G+) has:
 
Quote:
emergent knowledge practices of the early-modern period (1450-1750)
.
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Reply #117 - 17.03.2015 at 10:25:37
 
This Vienna job add ("Universitätsassistent/in ("post doc")am Institut für Geschichte") has 1550-1815 for "early modern":
Quote:
Erwartet wird die Kooperation im Forschungsprojekt „Vom Kulturkonflikt zum Nationalkonflikt: Modalitäten und Spielräume diplomatischer Konfliktlösung in der Frühen Neuzeit (1550-1815)“.

 
 


 
Seen thanks to Mareike König on G+.
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Reply #118 - 25.03.2015 at 09:52:28
 
This Miami University job add ("Visiting Assistant Professor, Early Modern European History") has:
Quote:
in the history of Early Modern Europe (1450-1750)
.
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Reply #119 - 25.03.2015 at 10:05:32
 
This HU Berlin press release re RSA 2015 (2015-03-24) has:
Quote:
Die Epoche der Renaissance (1300-1600) fasziniert die Menschen bis heute.
.
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Reply #120 - 06.05.2015 at 11:37:35
 
This job add (Bates College, Visiting Assistant Professor) has:
Quote:
Early Modern Europe (1400-1750)
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Reply #121 - 27.07.2015 at 16:29:17
 
Alun Withey at https://twitter.com/DrAlun/status/625669821401825284 pointed me to Thony Christie: When did the (Scientific) Renaissance take place? ( "The Renaissance Mathematicus" 2010-02-07).
 
Some quotes from there:
Quote:
one of them had the following to say:
<...>
The Renaissance started in the 1430s and may be considered complete by 1560, and was driven by the sponsorship of the nobility, perhaps the last flowering of the feudal system.

 
<...>
 
 
Quote:
In terms of artificial historical periods the Renaissance is a particularly difficult beast to pin down (as is for very similar reasons the Scientific Revolution) because it has less to do with any socio-cultural attributes, such as the introduction of the deep blade plough, as with a philosophical mindset that was held by an elitist minority of the population. The problem is made even more complex by the fact that there was not one set of intellectual values that define the Renaissance but sets of varying and even contradictory ones that existed side by side over the period in question. This is wonderfully illustrated in the protracted mudslinging match between Johannes Kepler and Robert Fludd. Fludd is a Renaissance magus in all his glory revelling in alchemy in its most arcane form and totally rejecting the encroaching wave of mathematical science, one of whose staunchest exponents was Kepler. For the historian the answer in surely simple, Fludd is a representative of the dying Renaissance and Kepler an early personification of modern science. Wrong! Kepler is just as much part of the Renaissance as Fludd (who, by the way, also made sensible contribution to the progress of science) but with a different set of Renaissance philosophical beliefs.

 
<...>
 
Quote:
The Renaissance proper was initially a literary movement and is said to start with Petrarca (1304 – 1374) gaining momentum over the next two centuries expanding into art and reaching a climax some time around 1500 or slightly later. Originally a return to the style of the classical or golden Latin in literature as exemplified by Cicero in its later phase it came to include the great Greek authors and in the 16th century the humanist became identified with the tri lingua scholar fluent in Latin Greek and Hebrew. This movement in the humanities (from which this branch of academia takes its name) continues to flourish into the 17th century and pinning down exactly where it ends is very difficult. Francis Yates sees its demise somewhere in the Thirty Years War with humanism still a dominant intellectual force before the start of this bloody altercation but very much in decline after the smoke had cleared on the battle fields of Middle Europe. On the whole I tend to agree with her but I would note that when I attended an English grammar school in the 1960s the model of pedagogic excellence to which I was exposed was a modified version of the Renaissance humanist ideals with A-Levels in Latin, Greek and Ancient History being the most exalted educational goal.

 
This would give us something like ca. 1337 to ca. 1648. (If I read it correctly.)
 
Quote:
I personally take the appearance of the manuscript of the first Latin translation of Ptolemaeus’ Geographia in Florence in 1409, as a convenient starting point of the Scientific Renaissance, as this led to new developments in the sciences that increased and accelerated throughout the 15th century.

As I have already indicated above I personally reject both the Scientific Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution.
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Reply #122 - 12.08.2015 at 09:00:15
 
The Washington (Folger Shakespeare Library) conference Periodization 2.0 (2015-11-05/07) covers sevral topics relevant to this thread here.  
 
Quote:
Description: This symposium will interrogate the intellectual consequences of the habits and practices of periodization. It seeks to push the discussion of periodization beyond first-wave debates (such as “Renaissance” versus “Early Modern”) to consider various modes of temporal organization. Scholars from a variety of disciplines will discuss how period categories function in their respective academic homes, and to consider how trans-disciplinary intellectual conversations are affected by diverse epistemologies of periodization. Sessions will explore the constructive intellectual framework that periodization provides to scholars, what historical study might look like without traditional period divisions, emergent models of temporal organization, the ways material culture allows scholars to rethink temporal categories, how period categories are deployed in the study of the fine arts, the notion of historical period in the context of literary forms, and, as a case study, to what extent Shakespeare’s plays themselves may shape notions of historical periodization.


Organizer: Kristen Poole is Professor of English at the University of Delaware. She is author of, most recently, Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare’s England: Spaces of Demonism, Divinity, and Drama (2011). Her current work focuses on the place of allegory in seventeenth-century scientific thought.


Thursday, November 5, 2015

6:30-7:30
Plenary lecture

Ethan Shagan (History, University of California, Berkeley)


7:30-8:30 Reception


Friday, November 6, 2015

9:30-11:00
Session 1: “Reason Not the Need”

This panel will consider the intellectual value of working with historical periods. It will consider why such divisions, however construed, provide a necessary and constructive intellectual framework for examining the past.

Speakers: Tim Harris (History, Brown University); Steven Zwicker (English, Washington University in St. Louis)

   Chair: Alice Dailey (English, Villanova University)


11:30-1:00
Session 2: “Untimely”

This panel will explore what historical study looks like without traditional period divisions. What does historical study look like without our familiar historical categories? What are emergent new models of temporal organization? Is it possible to study history without historical division?

Speakers: James Simpson (English, Harvard University)

   Chair: Kristen Poole


2:30-4:00
Session 3: “Thing Time”

This panel will question how the study of material cultural makes us re-think temporal categories. How does the longevity – or the ephemerality – of material objects work with or against traditional period divisions? How does matter shape our understanding of time?

Speakers: Kate Giles (Archaeology, University of York); Natasha Korda (English, Wesleyan University)

   Chair: Jeffrey Todd Knight (English, University of Washington)


Saturday, November 7, 2015

9:30-11:00
Session 4: “Period Aesthetics”

This panel will discuss how period categories are active in the study of the fine arts. While cultural history might have one particular relationship with periodization, do aesthetic/time categories like “Baroque,” “Mannerist,” “Metaphysical” continue to do a different type of intellectual work? How are such categories used in musicology, art history, poetics?

Speakers: Wendy Heller (Musicology, Princeton University); Keith Moxey (Art History, Columbia University); Gordon Teskey (English, Harvard University)

   Chair: Lauren Shohet (English, Villanova University)


11:30-1:00
Session 5: “Forms and Time”

This panel considers what happens to the notion of historical period in the context of literary forms. How does the continuity of form across time complicate other political/regnal/social markers of historical period? Or, conversely, how might the introduction of new literary forms function as their own type of period markers?

Speakers: Heather Dubrow (English, Fordham University); Mihoko Suzuki (English, University of Miami)

   Chair: Alan Stewart (English, Columbia University)


2:30-4:00
Session 6: “Shakestime”

This panel considers how Shakespeare and “Shakespeare” relate to historical period. How has “Shakespeare” come to define a period, or to defy period? To what extent did Shakespeare’s plays themselves shape our notions of historical period?

Speakers: Julian Yates (English, University of Delaware); Julia Reinhard Lupton (English, University of California, Irvine)

   Chair: Douglas Bruster (English, University of Texas, Austin)


4:10-5:15
Final Moderated Discussion

Facilitators: David Wallace (English, University of Pennsylvania), Kristen Poole

 


 
Seen thanks to Elyse Martin on the FICINO email distribution list
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Reply #123 - 15.09.2015 at 08:59:37
 
This entry by Brill for the online version of their Dictionary of Renaissance Latin from Prose Sources / Lexique de la prose latine de la Renaissance Online : Second, Revised and Significantly Expanded Edition / Deuxième édition revue et considérablement augmentée has:
 
Quote:
An online version of the first dictionary of Renaissance Latin, based on its second revised print edition. It records the vocabulary of over 230 Latin prose authors from different regional backgrounds who wrote between c. 1300 and c. 1600, and gives translations in French and English in approximately 11,000 entries.
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Re: Periodisations, borders
Reply #124 - 13.10.2015 at 15:45:03
 
This CfP (for the Oxford 2016-07-05/07 Scientiae : Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World conference) has:
Quote:
Proposals are invited for the fifth annual Scientiae conference on disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800). The major premise of this conference series is that knowledge during this period was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of theories, practices and objects, which had yet to be separated into their modern ‘scientific’ configurations.

 


Seen thanks to https://twitter.com/MEM_PG_Confs/status/653923172798984192
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Reply #125 - 04.11.2015 at 10:29:38
 
This job add has:
Quote:
The Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater seeks a tenure-track assistant professor to teach introductory and upper-level courses in Early Modern European History, 1550-1850, beginning August 2016. Research fields should complement existing faculty expertise and may include any specialization in Early Modern European history, roughly constituted as 1550-1850.

 
Is my impression that that upper border of "early modern" advances by more than x years in x years correct? If it should be correct: when did that start? In which year will the year of the posting be included in "early modern"?
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Reply #126 - 09.12.2015 at 08:48:32
 
At http://zkm.de/en/event/2015/10/globale-allahs-automata you get information about the Karlsruhe 2015-10-31/2016-02-28 exhibtion GLOBALE: Allah’s Automata
Artifacts of the Arab Islamic Renaissance (800–1200)
. The write (i.a.) : Quote:
The first Renaissance did not take place in Europe, but in Mesopotamia. Arabic-Islamic culture functioned – from a media-archaeological point of view – as a mediator between classical antiquity and the early Modern age in Europe. As part of the exhibiton »Exo-Evolution« and on the basis of outstanding examples, the exhibition explores the rich and fascinating world of the automata that were developed and built during the golden age of the Arabic-Islamic cultures, the period from the early 9th to the 13th century.

The machines to glorify God Almighty draw mainly on the traditions of Greek Alexandria and Byzantium. They introduced spectacular innovations, which did not emerge in Europe until the Modern era: permanent energy supply, universalism, and programmability. For the first time, four of the master manuscripts of automata construction from Baghdad, Northern Mesopotamia, and Andalusia are on show together: the al-Jāmic bayn al-cilm wa-’l-camal an-nāfic fī ṣinācat al-ḥiyal {Kompendium on the Theory and Practice of the Mechanical Arts} by Ibn al-Razzāz al-Jazarī (1206 CE), the Kitāb al-asrār fī natāʾij al-afkār {The Book of Secrets in the Results of Ideas} by the Andalusian engineer Aḥmad ibn Khalaf al-Murādī, the Kitāb al-ḥiyal {Book of Ingenious Devices} (about 830 CE) by the Banū Mūsā ibn Shākir and the treatise al-Āla allatī tuzammir bi-nafsihā {The Instrument Which Plays by Itself} (850 CE), a masterpiece of all modern programmable music automata.

 


 
Pointed to at http://www.muslimheritage.com/article/automata-review-exhibition (which I did see thanks to https://twitter.com/dhayton/status/674346904537444352 ).
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Reply #127 - 15.12.2015 at 11:18:36
 
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Reply #128 - 16.12.2015 at 11:46:27
 
This Job add has:
Quote:
Postdoctoral Fellowship focusing on

Confessional Dynamics in Islamic Legal Thought and Practice in the Ottoman Empire, 15th-18th centuries

at Bogazici University

<...>

With the goal of building on the existing scholarship and opening it up to new questions related to confession-building, we invite proposals for a two-year postdoctoral project exploring some aspect of Islamic law in connection with the confessional politics of the early modern Ottoman Empire.
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Reply #129 - 16.02.2016 at 10:02:32
 
I received the following job add:
 
Quote:

The UCL Italian Department is very pleased to share the following announcement:

Applications are invited for a Lectureship in Italian Renaissance Studies at University College London. The job is advertised on UCL's main website, Ref:1535620, and the closing date for applications is 15 March 2016 (23:59 GMT).

UCL seeks to appoint a Lecturer (Grade 8) in Italian Renaissance Studies, within the School of European Languages, Culture and Society. The School would particularly like to strengthen its provision in the research and teaching of Italian Renaissance culture (broadly defined within literary, historical or cultural disciplines and within the period c.1400-c.1700). The ability also to teach in one or more of the following areas may be an asset: Renaissance visual culture; History of philosophy or religion in the Renaissance; Renaissance performance, theatre and music; reception of the Italian Renaissance. The postholder will be required to contribute to the teaching of Italian language courses within the Italian Department, as well as to contribute to the Department's and Faculty's teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels on the basis of research expertise, and to contribute to the running of the Department, the School and the University generally. The successful candidate will be expected to take up the position on 01 September 2016, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Key Requirements:

The postholder will have a PhD or equivalent and a proven track record of research and publications in an area of Italian Renaissance Studies. The postholder will be completely fluent in both English and Italian, and have the ability to supervise academic work by undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Further Details

Further particulars, including a full job description, can be accessed at: http://tinyurl.com/zlyqp9h. If you have any queries regarding the vacancy please contact Dr Catherine Keen on c.keen@ucl.ac.uk.
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Reply #130 - 03.03.2016 at 09:48:35
 
This webpage on a 2016-04-08 Warburg institute colloquium has, i.a.:
Quote:
'Inexcusabiles' - The Debate on Salvation and the Virtues
of the Pagans in the Early Modern Period (1595 - 1772)

8 April 2016

Organisers: Alberto Frigo (University of Reims) and Guido Giglioni (Warburg Institute)

Speakers include: Michela Catto (FBK-ISR, Trento), Alberto Frigo (Reims), Guido Giglioni (Warburg Institute), Douglas Hedley (Cambridge),  Franck Lessay (Paris), John Marenbon (Cambridge), Giuliano Mori, Michael Moriarty (Cambridge), François Trémolières (CELLF and Paris Ouest Nanterre) and Han van Ruler (Rotterdam)

In his pioneering Le Problème du salut des infidèles (1912, 1934), Louis Capéran devoted a number of pages to the theological debate on pagan salvation and the limbo at the time of Fénelon and Rousseau. More recently, Michael Moriarty has produced a comprehensive study on this topic (Oxford 2011), highlighting the role played by the French moralists. Yet the multiple forms that the Medieval and Renaissance debate on the pagans took during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries remain to be addressed in full. This one-day conference intends to fill this gap by looking at the history of early modern controversies on the salvation and virtues of the pagans. The posthumous edition of Montaigne’s Essais (1595) and Johann August Eberhard’s Neue Apologie des Socrates (1772) are the chronological limits that define the context that will be examined in this conference.
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Reply #131 - 19.04.2016 at 09:02:14
 
Laura Sangha: On periodisation: an introduction (2016-04-19) has i.a.:
Quote:
The answer to what ‘early modern’ means is, of course, 1480-1700. Or perhaps 1500-1750. Or maybe 1450-1800. Actually it really depends. Oh, and if you are outside of Europe and North America you might not recognise the term at all, being equipped with a completely different way to think about your national past.

The problem is not just that ‘early modern’ is a loose category, since its beginning and end are impossible to define. It is also a relatively recent term – it was only in the 1970s that ‘early modern history’ became established as a distinct academic field, and of course the field only makes sense in partnership with the ‘modern’ era (since it’s the ‘early’ bit of it).

(highlighting: hck)
 


 
Seen thanks to Borodie Waddell on Twitter.
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Reply #132 - 24.05.2016 at 12:03:16
 
This Oxford 2016-05-19 job add has (i.a.):
Quote:
We are seeking a Departmental Lecturer in Global Early Modern History (1450 – 1750), tenable from 1 October 2016 for a fixed term of one year. The appointment is to fulfil teaching needs while Dr Alan Strathern is on academic leave, and is offered by the History Faculty in association with Brasenose College and St John’s College.

 
(All highlighting: hck)
 
Alan Strathern's profile page has (i.a.):
Quote:
I work on early modern global history (1500-1800), with a special interest in those parts of the world that came into contact with Portuguese imperialism and the theme of religious encounters.

 
 
(Once again: All highlighting: hck)
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Reply #133 - 03.08.2016 at 08:47:42
 
This University of California - Santa Barbara 2016-07-29 job add has:
 
Quote:
assistant professorship in Early Modern Western European history, c. 1500-1700, including Britain and the German-speaking Lands, excluding France
.
 
(As usual: highlighting : hck.)
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Reply #134 - 28.09.2016 at 09:46:52
 
This 2016-09-21 Northeastern Illinois University job add has:  
 
Quote:
Early Modern Europe and the World: Assistant Professor with a strong field in Europe (excluding Russia) from c. 1450-c. 1789.

 
(Highlighting mine.)
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Reply #135 - 28.09.2016 at 09:50:32
 
And this 2016-09-22 Auburn University job add has:
 
Quote:
The Department of History at Auburn University invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of assistant professor in Early Modern European History, ca. 1450-1700.

 
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Reply #136 - 15.03.2017 at 09:02:41
 
This Williamsburg (College of William and Mary) 2017-03-10 job add has:
 
Quote:
Visiting Assistant Professor/Early Modern Europe

...
Quote:
We seek an individual with expertise in the field of continental European history between 1450 and 1750.

 
(Highlighting hck)
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Reply #137 - 07.06.2017 at 10:12:37
 
This European University Institute 2017-05-31 job add has:
 
Quote:
a Chair in the Early Modern History of the Mediterranean (c 1450-1700) in its broader context

 
(As always: highlighting hck)
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Reply #138 - 21.09.2017 at 11:16:38
 
This University of Southern California job add for an "Assistant or Associate Professor of Early Modern Art and Visual Culture" has:
 
Quote:
the history of art, visual, and/or material culture of the early modern period (ca. 1500–1800).
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Reply #139 - 27.09.2017 at 14:13:20
 
I received this via the FICINO email distribution list (and, as usual, the highlighting is mine):
 
Quote:

Villa I Tatti Call for Applications

Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2018?2019 academic year.

I Tatti Fellowship (one year; deadline: October 15) for post-doctoral research in any aspect of the Italian Renaissance broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century, and geographically to include transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian etc.).

Wallace Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore the historiography and impact of the Italian Renaissance in the Modern Era (19th?21st centuries).

Berenson Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore "Italy in the World". Projects should address the transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian etc.) during the Renaissance, broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century.

Digital Humanities Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for projects that cut across traditional disciplinary boundaries and actively employ digital technology. Applicants can be scholars in the humanities or social sciences, librarians, archivists, and data science professionals. Projects should apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to topics on any aspect of the Italian Renaissance.

Villa I Tatti - Bo?aziçi University Joint Fellowship (one year; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral research focusing on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). Scholars will spend a semester at Villa I Tatti and a semester at the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Bo?aziçi University.

Craig Hugh Smyth Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for curators and conservators. Projects can address any aspect of the Italian Renaissance art or architecture, including landscape architecture.

David and Julie Tobey Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for research on drawings, prints, and illustrated manuscripts from the Italian Renaissance, and especially the role that these works played in the creative process, the history of taste and collecting, and questions of connoisseurship.

For more information on all fellowships at Villa I Tatti please visit http://itatti.harvard.edu/fellowships


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Reply #140 - 23.11.2017 at 09:45:53
 
This LMU Munich job add is for a Quote:
Full Professorship (W3) of German Late Medieval and Early Modern Literature (up to 1700) with a main focus on text theories (Chair)
and has
Quote:
from the Late Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period, that is from the 13th to the end of the 17th century

 


 
Update: The German version of that job add is at http://www.uni-muenchen.de/aktuelles/stellenangebote/profs/20170921111729.html
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Reply #141 - 24.11.2017 at 10:53:44
 
This Queen Mary University of London job add has:
Quote:
Lecturer in Early Modern English History 1500 - 1750

...
Quote:
The School is seeking to appoint a Lecturer in English History 1500-1700 who will be expected to contribute to the full range of the School’s teaching from undergraduate to doctoral level, and to contribute to the School’s research culture and REF submissions. The successful candidate will have a PhD or equivalent experience, a strong background in early modern English history and experience of undergraduate teaching.
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