Welcome, Guest. Please Login.
Web4Ren Forum (W4RF): Many sorts of information of potential relevance to those interested in Renaissance Intellectual History
07.10.2022 at 04:59:57
News: 2022-07-29: Summer break.

Pages: 1
Reading 2010-07: Controversy, protest, ridicule (Read 6270 times)
hck
ModeratorAndAdmin
***




Posts: 5669
Gender: male
Reading 2010-07: Controversy, protest, ridicule
27.07.2009 at 15:18:03
 
A CfP for the University of Reading Early Modern Studies Conference 9-11 July 2010 on the subject of Controversy, protest, ridicule and laughter can be found at http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/07/27/916/ .
 
Quote:
Controversy, protest, ridicule and laughter are means to register more than disagreement: they convey contemptuous opposition to an opponent. How can the study of their uses advance our understanding of the nature and development of public debate in the early modern period?

How were new media (theatres, newsbooks, periodicals) and traditional forms (sermons, proclamations, disputations) used by the two (or more) sides in early modern controversies? What were the connections between ‘low’ literary forms (pamphlets, ballads, satires, libels), and the learned seriocomic tradition of, for example, Erasmus’s Praise of Folly?
What were the sites of protest: Parliament; stage; university; alehouse; Inns of Court - and what connections, if any, existed between these spaces?

 
 
Their deadline is 2009-12-04.
 


 
ETA: The CfP can also be found at http://earlymodern-lit.blogspot.com/2009/07/controversy-protest-ridicule-laughte r.html .
Back to top
 
 

for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
Email   IP Logged
hck
ModeratorAndAdmin
***




Posts: 5669
Gender: male
Re: Reading 2010-07: Controversy, protest, ridicul
Reply #1 - 15.10.2009 at 10:27:16
 
Back to top
 
 

for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
Email   IP Logged
hck
ModeratorAndAdmin
***




Posts: 5669
Gender: male
Re: Reading 2010-07: Controversy, protest, ridicul
Reply #2 - 16.10.2009 at 11:04:51
 
Quote from hck on 27.07.2009 at 15:18:03:
A CfP for the University of Reading Early Modern Studies Conference 9-11 July 2010 on the subject of Controversy, protest, ridicule and laughter can be found at http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/07/27/916/ .

 
Revised version now available at http://www.emintelligencer.org.uk/2009/10/15/call-for-papers-controversy-protest -ridicule-laughter-1500-1750/ .
Back to top
 
 

for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
Email   IP Logged
hck
ModeratorAndAdmin
***




Posts: 5669
Gender: male
Re: Reading 2010-07: Controversy, protest, ridicul
Reply #3 - 26.04.2010 at 13:34:04
 
The conference programme is now available at http://earlymodernhistory1.blogspot.com/2010/04/controversy-protest-ridicule-lau ghter.html . (And hence I'll move this thread over to "Events".)
 
Perhaps of most interest to members/readers of this forum here:
Quote:
Adam Smyth, Taking Jokes Seriously: Why Renaissance Jests Often Don’t Seem
Funny
Filomena Calabrese, Interpreting Laughter in the Italian Renaissance Facetia
Tim Reinke-Williams, Xenophobia in seventeenth-century jest-books
2.3 Natural philosophy and philosophy
Chair: Alan Cromartie
Michael Choptiany, Petrus Ramus versus Jacobus Schegkius: a chapter in the early
modern Aristotelian controversy
Philip Sanders, Rejection and ridicule: the fate of Kepler’s polyhedral cosmology,
1600 to 1781
Ingrid Jendrzejewski, “Exceedingly Ridiculous”: A Century of Laughter and
Astronomy

...
Quote:
Jayson Althofer, Sir Lionel Lindsay’s aristocratic revolt to restore Rabelaisian
laughter in modern Australia
Irina Nicolaeva, Laughter of rulers in early modern Europe: possibilities of historical
and psychological analysis aimed to verification
Adriana Bontea, Innocence, laughter and the limits of reason

...
Quote:
Randall Albury, Fanning the Sparks of Folly in Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier
(1528)
Virginia Murphy, Foolish Controversy: Folly’s Mediating Role in Lyndsay’s Ane
Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis
Daniel Donnelly, The Anti-Courtier: Music, Social Criticism, and the Academy in
Antonfrancesco Doni's Dialogo della musica

...
Quote:
Thomas Davies, A Machiavellian “Mirror for Princes” in William Shakespeare’s 1&2
Henry IV ?

...
Quote:
Catherine Curtis, Making the case for European peace: the laughter of protest in the
court of Henry VIII
Sophie Murray, Subversive humour and sites of resistance in the Henrician
Reformation
Katy Gibbons, Ridiculing the Elizabethan regime on an international stage:
Leicester’s Commonwealth (1584) and its French translation, Discours de la Vie
(1585)
3.00-3.30 Tea
3.30-5.00 Session 11
11.1 Immoral figures in print, 1570s-1620s
Chair: tba
Una McIlvenna, The Imaginary Library of the Duchesse de Montpensier and other
Libels: Court Scandal and the Parlement de Paris
Nataliya Karnachuk, Laughter and aggression: reflections of gender crisis in English
broadsides and pamphlets
Koji Yamamoto, Mocking monopolists and projectors in Elizabethan and Jacobean
England
9
11.2 Politics, mockery and satire
Chair: tba
Jean-Christophe Van Thienen, “The wittie man laughs least”: George Herbert's
seditious anagrams in The Temple (1633)
Christina M. Carlson, “Squint Ey’d Looks & Linsie-Wolsie Gowne[s]”:
Political Prints of the late 1620s and 30s and Ben Jonson’s The Magnetic Lady (1633)

 
 


 
See also the conference website (and the conference programme there (PDF format)).
Back to top
 
 

for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
Email   IP Logged
Pages: 1