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Hayton: teaching & modeling curiosity (Read 3044 times)
hck
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Hayton: teaching & modeling curiosity
17.09.2010 at 09:00:26
 
Two interesting and IMO relevant blog posts by Darin Hayton:

 
The second one ends with these words:
Quote:
So, armed with my copy of Thomas Browne, Religio medici. A New Edition, Corrected and Amended. With Notes and Annotations never before published. To which is added the Life of the Author. Also Sir Kenelm Digby’s Observations (London: J. Toruck, 1736), which includes an interesting set of notes on the fly leaves, an owner’s signature, and some marginalia, I’m off to model curiosity. With some luck, it will be contagious.

 Smiley
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« Last Edit: 17.09.2010 at 10:42:04 by hck »  

for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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hck
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Hayton on teaching: part 2
Reply #1 - 07.10.2010 at 15:10:37
 
Quote from hck on 17.09.2010 at 09:00:26:
Two interesting and IMO relevant blog posts by Darin Hayton:


The second one ends with these words:
Quote:
So, armed with my copy of Thomas Browne, Religio medici. A New Edition, Corrected and Amended. With Notes and Annotations never before published. To which is added the Life of the Author. Also Sir Kenelm Digby’s Observations (London: J. Toruck, 1736), which includes an interesting set of notes on the fly leaves, an owner’s signature, and some marginalia, I’m off to model curiosity. With some luck, it will be contagious.

Smiley

 
Now see also:

  • Formulating Questions in the History of Science (2010-09-29) : making use of hayton's copy of Thomas Browne: Religio medici (London : J. Torbuck & C. Corbett 1736)  
     
  • Explaining Good Questions in the History of Science (2010-10-05) Quote:
    Again, for students who have not had the opportunity (or have not been forced) to formulate their own questions, they are unfamiliar with the distinctions between good, fruitful questions and bad, or dead-end questions. Even the difference in types of questions seems a bit blurry for them—some students asked interesting, open-ended questions followed immediately by yes-no type factual questions. Other students posed really interesting questions that were, unfortunately, entirely unanswerable, either because they wouldn’t be able to get to the necessary archives or because the sources simply don’t exist. So, next time, in addition to connecting the descriptive information to the questions, I need to explain why certain questions are fruitful and what precisely makes them good questions. At the same time, I should sketch out how to go about investigating these “good” questions.

    That said, the students did produce a number of interesting questions that showed they were grappling with the assignment. For example, one student is working on Henry Cornelius Agrippa’s The Vanity of the Arts & Sciences (1694). She asked: “For what reason is the book even now, in 1694, 150 years past the author’s death, being published and circulated?  What is its relevance at this time?  In what way does it retain relevance?” She is clearly thinking about the meaning of the text in its particular historical context. And this is a question that she can begin to answer by thinking about the intended audience, the translator’s, the printer’s, and the bookseller’s role in producing the text.
    ... Quote:
    Previously I was convinced that student research papers would improve if we concentrated on the research, formulating, crafting, and writing. While these aspects certainly need attention, most research papers go awry much earlier in the process because the initial question is poorly formed or the wrong sort of question. The goal is to help students learn how to recognize and formulate good questions and, equally important, how to investigate those questions.


 
 
Great posts IMO!
 
Whosoever teaches in any of our fields should have a look at all of them!
 


 
Found thanks to http://twitter.com/dhayton/status/26643787213 .
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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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Re: Hayton: teaching & modeling curiosity
Reply #2 - 22.10.2010 at 10:21:12
 
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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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