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Vancouver 2012-04: Disciplines of knowing (Read 4060 times)
hck
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Vancouver 2012-04: Disciplines of knowing
12.05.2011 at 11:14:04
 
Received via the FICINO email distribution list:
Quote:

SCIENTIAE
Disciplines of knowing in the early-modern world
Simon Fraser University
Vancouver, B.C.
April 2012
(Proposal deadline: September 30th, 2011)

http://www.d.umn.edu/~smatthew/Scientiae_Conference_Vancouver.html

Paper and panel proposals are invited for *Scientiae*: a new interdisciplinary conference on early-modern science, to be held in Vancouver, B.C. (under the auspices of Simon Fraser University), April 26th-28th, 2012. The working assumption of the conference is that interdisciplinarity is not only an option, but a necessity, for the study of early-modern culture in its knowledge of the natural world. That is because period science is itself an interdisciplinary function, emerging from Biblical exegesis, advanced design, and literary humanitas; as well as from natural philosophy, alchemy, craft traditions, etc. By the same token, emergent science lends unique coherence to the gathered diversity of early-modern or Renaissance scholarship, when it is taken as an intellectual focal point. *Scientiae* offers a forum for scholars of the period’s art and literature, as well as its intellectual history, to illuminate aspects of early-modern science in the latter’s proper strangene
ss.

Topics and questions may include, but are by no means limited to:
-- Protestantism and science: a decisive thesis?
-- Nature and scripture: which interprets which?
-- Integrating the Iberian empires – a recalibration, or a transformation?
-- “Experimental” reading.
-- Royal Society rhetoric: how well has it really been understood?
-- Renaissance philosophy and the development of a “new” cosmology and anthropology.
-- Paracelsianism, Neoplatonism, alchemy: where are we now?
-- Invention and discovery: separable economies?
-- Theological origins of the new science.
-- Hermeneutic consequences of the Newtonian settlement.
-- Scholastic scientia and postmodern theory.
-- Early-modern information: is there any?
-- Science and mimesis: reflection, or transformation?
-- Early-modern literature and the new knowledge: friends, or foes?

The plenary speakers for *Scientiae* will be Mario Biagioli and Peter Harrison. Dr. Biagioli is Distinguished Professor of Law and Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Director of the Center for Innovation Studies at the University of California (Davis). Dr. Harrison is Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion, Director of the Ian Ramsey Centre, and a Fellow of Harris Manchester College at Oxford University.

Other prominent speakers currently expected at *Scientiae* include: Amir Alexander, Stephen Clucas, Sven Dupré, Angus Gowland, Hakan Hakansson, Kevin Killeen, William Newman, Lawrence Principe, Claire Preston, and Jonathan Sawday. The conference co-organizers are James Dougal Fleming (English, SFU); and Steven Matthews (History, U of Minnesota at Duluth).

All conference sessions will take place at SFU Harbour Centre, overlooking the waterfront in the heart of downtown Vancouver. A conference rate will be available at the Delta Suites Hotel, located directly across the street from Harbour Centre. Rich options for dining, shopping, and entertainment are within walking distance of the conference site. Direct transport links to Vancouver Airport, and to almost anywhere in the metropolitan area, including extensive outdoor recreational opportunities, are available from Waterfront Station, also steps away from Harbour Centre.

Paper and/or panel proposals of no more than 500 words, in Word or .pdf format, by SEPTEMBER 30, 2011, to SILENUS@SFU.CA.

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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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hck
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Re: Vancouver 2012-04: Disciplines of knowing
Reply #1 - 03.08.2011 at 14:01:12
 
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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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hck
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Re: Vancouver 2012-04: Disciplines of knowing
Reply #2 - 05.10.2011 at 10:02:29
 
I received the following update via email (the deadline has been extended to 2011-10-18):
Quote:


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
This is the third and final call for *Scientiae: Disciplines of Knowing in the Early-Modern World*, a conference to be held in Vancouver, B.C., under the auspices of Simon Fraser University, April 26th-28th, 2012. As described in the original CFP (below, in English and French), the conference is situated at the nexus of interdisciplinary early-modern/Renaissance studies, and history/philosophy of science. It thus cuts across the grain of both those sorts of meetings, providing an opportunity for concerted and holistic focus on early-modern science as a topic _sui generis_.

In order to give all who may be interested the opportunity to submit a proposal, despite the pressures of the academic autumn, the deadline for *Scientiae* has been extended to OCTOBER 18TH, 2011. Proposals should be sent as Word or .pdf attachments to:

silenus@sfu.ca

The keynote speakers for *Scientiae* will be Mario Biagioli (UC Davis) and Peter Harrison (Oxford). Dr. Biagioli is the author of *Galileo's Instruments of Credit* (Chicago, 2006) and *Galileo, Courtier* (Chicago, 1993), among many other publications. Dr. Harrison's publications include *The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science* (Cambridge, 2007), *The Bible, Protestantism and the Rise of Natural Science* (Cambridge, 1998), and, as editor, *The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion* (Cambridge, 2010).

Palgrave Macmillan has expressed an interest in bringing out a volume of essays based on papers given at *Scientiae*, and we are currently working out further publication arrangements.

All sessions of *Scientiae* will be held in the Segal and Fletcher meeting spaces of the Harbour Centre campus, Simon Fraser University:
http://www.sfu.ca/mecs/harbour+centre/meeting.html .
All conference spaces are tech-enabled, modern, bright, and comfortable.

A favorable conference rate will be available at the Delta Suites Hotel, directly across the street from Harbour Centre: see
http://www.deltahotels.com/en/hotels/british-columbia/delta-vancouver-suites/ .
Many other accommodation options are available in the immediate area. The conference location, waterfront in the heart of downtown Vancouver, is excellent for walking, dining, shopping, etc. Late April, with luck, brings warm spring weather to the region; even while skiing continues on the local mountains, including Whistler.

For more information, and ongoing updates, see the conference website:

http://www.d.umn.edu/~smatthew/Scientiae_Conference_Vancouver.html .

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
CFP (English):

Paper and panel proposals are invited for *Scientiae*: a new interdisciplinary conference on early-modern science, to be held in Vancouver, B.C. (under the auspices of Simon Fraser University), April 26th-28th, 2012. The working assumption of the conference is that interdisciplinarity is not only an option, but a necessity, for the study of early-modern culture in its knowledge of the natural world. That is because period science is itself an interdisciplinary function, emerging from Biblical exegesis, advanced design, and literary humanitas; as well as from natural philosophy, alchemy, craft traditions, etc. By the same token, emergent science lends unique coherence to the gathered diversity of early-modern or Renaissance scholarship, when it is taken as an intellectual focal point. *Scientiae* offers a forum for scholars of the period’s art and literature, as well as its intellectual history, to illuminate aspects of early-modern science in the latter’s proper strangeness.

Topics and questions may include, but are by no means limited to:
-- Protestantism and science: a decisive thesis?
-- Period medicine, from Scholasticism to Humanism and beyond.
-- Nature and scripture: which interprets which?
-- Integrating the Iberian empires – a recalibration, or a transformation?
-- “Experimental” reading.
-- Royal Society rhetoric: how well has it really been understood?
-- Renaissance philosophy and the development of a “new” cosmology and anthropology.
-- Paracelsianism, Neoplatonism, alchemy: where are we now?
-- Invention and discovery: separable economies?
-- Theological origins of the new science.
-- Hermeneutic consequences of the Newtonian settlement.
-- Scholastic scientia and postmodern theory.
-- Early-modern information: is there any?
-- Science and mimesis: reflection, or transformation?
-- Early-modern literature and the new knowledge: friends, or foes?

(French):
Nous invitons la soumission de propositions de communication ou de session pour *Scientiae*, un colloque inter-disciplinaire sur la science d’Ancien Régime qui prendra place à Vancouver,C.B. (sous les auspices de l’Université Simon Fraser),  du 26 au 28 avril 2012. Le principe de ce colloque est de poser que l’interdisciplinarité n’est pas seulement une possibilité, mais constitue une absolue nécessité pour qui veut étudier la culture des temps modernes (16e-18e siècles) quant au savoir qu’elle élabore sur la nature. Cette exigence vient du fait que la science de cette époque est elle-même une fonction interdisciplinaire, qui provient de l’exégèse biblique, des avancées des théories sur l’harmonie naturelle et de l’ humanitas littéraire, ainsi que de la philosophie naturelle, de l’alchimie, des traditions artisanales etc. Dans cette perspective, la science qui naît alors confère une exceptionnelle cohérence à la diversité qu’elle reçoit en héritage de l’érudition pré-moderne et Renaissance, dès lors qu’elle la prend comme point de référence. *Scientiae* se propose comme un forum pour les chercheurs travaillant sur l’art et la  littérature de cette époque, tout autant que sur l’histoire intellectuelle afin de mettre en lumière certains aspects de cette science pré-moderne tout en lui conservant, comme il se doit, sa particulière étrangeté.

Sujets et questions pourront comprendre, sans que ctte liste soit exhaustive :
-- Protestantisme et science: une thèse définitive?
-- Histoire de la médecine, depuis la Scholastique jusque l’Humanisme, et ses suites.
-- Nature et écriture: laquelle interprète laquelle?
-- Prendre en considération les empires ibériques – recentrage ou transformation?
-- Lecture “expérimentales”.
-- Rhétorique de la Royal Society: comment a-t-elle été comprise?
-- La philosophie de la Renaissance et le développement de “nouvelles” cosmologie and anthropologie.
-- Paracelsianisme, Néoplatonisme, alchimie: où en sommes-nous?
-- Invention et découverte: des économies distinctes?
-- Origines théologique de la nouvelle science.
-- Conséquences herméneutiques du consensus Newtonien.
-- Scientia scholastique et théorie postmoderne .
-- Information avant les temps modernes: peut-on en parler?
-- Science et mimesis: reflet ou transformation?
-- La littérature et les nouveaux savoirs sous l’Ancien Régime: amis ou ennemis?

-- JD Fleming (SFU), Steven Matthews (UMinn), Co-convenors silenus@sfu.ca

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