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FICINO email distribution list turns 21 (Read 2618 times)
hck
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FICINO email distribution list turns 21
26.09.2011 at 12:19:32
 
From, well, the FICINO email distribution list (Richard Raiswell):
Quote:
On 28 September 2011, the Ficino listserv turns 21.

Back in the summer of 1990 when the list was conceived, the idea of creating an on-going virtual seminar populated by scholars from across the globe was still very new. Instructors in the humanities still used blackboards, their lectures written on yellowing papers, annotated and glossed with details and insights garnered through years of repetition. Course packs were still photocopied by the bookstore, and syllabi peppered with references to curious corners of the library such as "in the reference section" or "on reserve." Most students still typed essays, and, in the name of social equity, some were still allowed to submit handwritten versions! Conference announcements were sent out by mail, and editors corresponded with contributors through a succession of letters. Not only were internet connections far from ubiquitous, and e-mail only beginning to become a staple of academic life but the idea of a virtual colleague-someone with whom one may collaborate through electronic media but whom one has never met-was cutting-edge stuff.

The idea of an e-mail list for Renaissance and early modern studies originated with Germaine Warkentin of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) at the University of Toronto. But with Warkentin away on research in Europe, the mantle passed to the CRRS's William Bowen to determine what such a system might look like, and how it might operate. To this end, Bowen approached Willard McCarty who had pioneered the Humanist listserv for what was then known as computing in the humanities-the precursor of digital humanities. Begun some three years earlier, Humanist was groundbreaking in itself, for it was only the second such list in the humanities, only a few months younger than the pioneering AnsaxNet.

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Over the years, the list has grown to become the most important community of early modern scholars on the web. Today, Ficino has some 794 members who hail from some 29 different countries. Of course, the lion's share of members are based in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, but we have members from Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Liechtenstein, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

And the future of Ficino? The list is still going strong, but the format needs some tweaking to take advantage of some of the recent trends in social networking, perhaps through Twitter or the nascent Iter Community that is now the focus of some Bowen's efforts. We are looking at new possibilities, but the current listserv model still remains an exceptionally valuable resource, and the only place on the web that can bring together all the right minds on any subject in early modern studies.

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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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hck
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Re: FICINO email distribution list turns 21
Reply #1 - 26.09.2011 at 12:21:16
 
1.   Thanks!
 
2.   Congratulations!
 
3.   Ad multos annos!
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for contact information etc. concerning hck (Heinrich C. Kuhn): see http://www.phil-hum-ren.uni-muenchen.de/php/Kuhn/
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